Business Wire Comments on Wall Street Journal story on Speed Traders

February 11, 2014

by Tom Becktold, Senior Vice President, Marketing

In case you missed Friday’s (February 7, 2014) Wall Street Journal story, Speed Traders Get an Edge, Scott Patterson reported about a high-frequency trader that licenses Business Wire content. In the piece, the reporter details how, with equal access to our file as news organizations, the firm was able to execute trades very quickly. Not exactly ground-breaking reporting, but in the Nanex research cited, you do see how rapidly events unfold once we issue news.

To answer the question, Business Wire provides one feed of news, so all subscribers – news media, consumer-facing sites, researchers, investment firms – have equal, simultaneous access to our file. There are no tiers of access (paid or unpaid) and no one gets a jump from us. The fact is that Business Wire, via its NX delivery technology, delivers its news feed to every recipient, at the same time.

This WSJ article is about how high speed traders might be ‘gaming the system’; that is, using technology to create a millisecond advantage on accessing news. And, that millisecond, which is one thousandth of a second , is apparently all it takes to make this a story.

Bloomberg’s Matt Levine provided excellent perspective on Friday with his story High Speed Traders Trade Faster Than Low Speed Traders.

Drawing upon the Journal article and the Nanex research, here’s a timeline that provides insight into how efficient our patented NX platform is – what you see is the trading firm, Bloomberg and Dow Jones acting on the Business Wire story within 300 milliseconds – a measurement that most of us, as humans, might have a hard time wrapping our head around:

  • · 16:00:00.000 – Market scheduled to close
  • · 16:00:00.175 – Business Wire issues Ulta press release
  • · 16:00:00.225 – Stock trades within 50 milliseconds of release
  • · 16:00:00.242 – Bloomberg News runs Ulta story
  • · 16:00:00.464 – Dow Jones runs Ulta story
  • · 16:00:00.688 – Nasdaq closing price set

As you can see, the release goes out, then recipients act on it; there is no jump in the delivery, only in how it is utilized.

A curious item from the Journal story also caught our attention: “Business Wire’s competitor, PR Newswire, says it doesn’t provide trading firms access to its “Disclosure Feed” despite frequent requests. The company says it provides the news feed to clients with the understanding that information provided won’t be used for trading purposes.”

As we noted, Business Wire does not have a separate “Disclosure Feed” precisely because markets move so fast. And, the last time we checked, PRN had a healthy licensing and reseller business that serves the investment community. As many investment firms now have high-speed trading desks, the statement appears disingenuous at best.

So, what does this all mean to our clients and network recipients? Business Wire remains committed to full, fair and broad-based disclosure, providing equal access to all market participants. With news organizations and investment firms increasingly relying on algorithms to trigger rapid coverage and trades, Business Wire ensures a simultaneous, level playing field to our content.

Business Wire was the first newswire to eliminate the 15 minute delay to the investment community back in 2000, in lock step with the letter and intent of Reg FD.

We have built our business around full and fair disclosure for all market participants. By doing so, we have earned the trust of our corporate clients each and every day for more than 52 years. We stand by our patented technology, our gold standard business model, and our commitment to the highest standards of security, performance and reliability.


Investor Communications vs. Social Disclosure on Social Media

October 22, 2013
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By Thomas Becktold, Senior Vice President, Marketing
The Wall Street Journal’s Ben DiPietro (@BenDiPietro1) recently filed a story, “The Dos and Don’ts of Social Media Disclosure.” Not surprisingly, we have something to add.
Ben interviewed E. Terrell Gilbert Jr., an attorney at Arnall Golden Gregory LLP, who provides some solid advice to IROs, like this, “Where I think companies are prone to slip up is if focus solely on the new ways to communicate with investors but forget the basics of disclosure.”
Where the article falls short is that it doesn’t distinguish between investor communications and disclosure on social media. It doesn’t address ownership issues of executives’ personal social media accounts that are used for investor communications. It also lumps investors into a single homogenous group, where IROs know that buy-side and sell-side investors have significant differences in their preferred communications platforms and content.
While Gilbert rightly suggests that a CEO should send out a tweet that includes a link to a press release to provide more detail about the company, he mixes up disclosure and investor communications.Here’s why: the press release is the disclosure, not the CEO’s tweet.
The press release would be filed as an 8-K, issued on the wire and posted to the company’s website to ensure full and simultaneous distribution and access to all market participants. The CEO tweet is an additive part of investor communications, providing an opportunity for the CEO to more directly engage audiences, not unlike an open earnings conference call.
Gilbert notes that if companies want social media to be the first place they make market-moving information public, they should “take the right steps to let investors know the CEO’s Twitter account or Facebook page is the recognized channel of distribution…” I’m not a lawyer, so I don’t dispute the accuracy of what he says, but from a communications perspective, there are a lot of problems here.
First, if you’re going to establish an executive’s personal social media account as a disclosure channel, you better lock down some written ground rules to protect the company. If the executive leaves, does he take his channel and the followers with him? Is it ok for the executive to mix in personal posts (“look at my kid’s new puppy!”), photos and comments that may be of no interest to investors?
The National Investor Relations Institute’s Southern California chapters recently had a panel discussion on “The Future of Investor Communications.” I was fortunate enough to be on that panel with Ben Claremon, a research analyst at Cove Street Capital. That discussion provided a microcosm of the varying needs of investor constituents. Claremon was clear that he did not want companies using Twitter, Facebook or other social channels to disseminate material news. As he put it, investing and investor communications is serious business, and using the latest social channel “trivializes what we are doing.” He wants relevant information via trusted channels in a timely manner.
As we’ve discussed before, social media was not designed for disclosure, does not provide simultaneous delivery to all market participants and is often loaded with non-relevant content. Your followers or readers don’t see every post from their followers.
Facebook uses hundreds of factors to determine which posts a user would be most interested in seeing, all beyond the control of the disclosing company. Twitter offers promoted tweets, allowing an advertiser to jump ahead of organic tweets. In all social media platforms, the likelihood that your users actually see the content you share is a function of how frequently they visit their channel, how many people they follow, how much those folks post and the type of content they engage with, among other factors.
Gilbert points out that “the FD in regulation FD stands for fair disclosure” and we most certainly agree. Social media should be used as an additive to investor communications, but in no way does it provide a level playing field for all market participants.

Business Wire – Our “Raison D’etre”

July 14, 2010

by Cathy Baron Tamraz, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Business Wire

Cathy Baron Tamraz

BW Chairman & CEO Cathy Baron Tamraz

SEC Chairman Mary Schapiro, in prepared remarks to the Society of Corporate Secretaries and Governance Professionals last Friday, stated the SEC is intent on ensuring that all investors have access to a highly complex and technologically sophisticated trading market.

We at Business Wire could not agree more — that’s been OUR intent as well for the past 50 years — to support and enhance full and fair disclosure, via our own patented Internet-based news delivery platform that ensures that material news is available to all market participants in an easily accessible and digestible format.

With all the hoopla about new newswire models, I thought it might be useful to provide some perspective on why we invented our business model and, further, the myriad and increasing benefits we provide to the investor relations and public relations communities.  There are two primary reasons companies use a commercial newswire: DISCLOSURE and DISTRIBUTION.  While the delivery mechanisms have radically transformed (from messenger, to mail, to dictate, to fax, to FM sideband, to satellite, to internet, mobile and more), the goals are everlasting — transparency and eyeballs.

It’s significant to note that Business Wire has been on the bleeding edge of this technological change.  In fact, most of the newswire technology changes these past 50 years have been driven by our company (via our proprietary internet patents and many other firsts in the industry). Having been born in the SF Bay Area, we live and breathe innovation and technology; it’s simply what we do and how we view our business model — everchanging and everlasting.

THE MANTRA:

Companies use Business Wire to both satisfy their regulatory requirements AND get the word out quickly and simultaneously to all market participants.  When you use Business Wire, you are assured of satisfying disclosure and getting the broadest distribution possible via our proprietary, secure network.  The benefit of ubiquitous distribution is that anyone interested has the opportunity to: buy a product, buy/sell a stock, attend an event, analyze a company, report on a story, blog, tweet, etc.

When your news is on Business Wire, everyone can access it via their choice of platform — and, most importantly, rely on the veracity of the information.

And therein lies the power of our brand — TRUST.

AT THE CORE:

Disclosure:

Material news is clearly a company’s most important news; simple logic suggests that it deserves the broadest possible distribution, maximum visibility, an authoritative, credible editorial environment and a permanent, easily accessible archive for future reference.  Business Wire has always been a convenient, effective and cost-efficient way to accomplish each of these critical objectives.

Business Wire is also a strong proponent of the spirit and intent of the SEC’s Regulation FD: full and fair disclosure means that all market participants have simultaneous and real-time access to corporate news that may influence their investment decisions.  The integrity of our financial marketplace is predicated on the principle of fairness and transparency; and that’s our sweet spot.

Business Wire’s proprietary NX platform (awarded U.S. and Canadian patents, and patent-pending in Europe) provides for equal access by institutional and individual investors.  We have been sanctioned as a recognized regulatory disclosure service in multiple international jurisdictions; as such our network security, redundant technical systems and operational procedures are audited annually by the world’s leading accounting firms to confirm Business Wire’s strict and continued compliance with rigorous approval criteria.  Simply put, it’s the best system out there — and built in-house, too.

With nearly 200 editors in 21 newsrooms worldwide, we authenticate and validate our members, vet copy for accuracy and legitimacy and catch countless client errors.  The coding, keywords and meta-tagging (XHTML) that we add to each release are critically important in how copy is processed by advanced search engines, enterprise IT systems, algo-traders and databases. While much of this behind-the-scenes process is invisible to issuers and investors, it is absolutely critical to the proper parsing and distribution of information given today’s highly intricate IT network architecture.

Lastly, we won’t outsource disclosure.  It’s way too complex to leave to someone else or put on auto-pilot.

Distribution:

The other major reason clients use a newswire is distribution; there is no better way to get your message out than Business Wire.  We have the most expansive global reach in the industry, capitalizing on strategic relationships with scores of national and international news agencies, major web portals, aggregators and, of course, our own robust and highly viewed website.

Most recently, we’ve leveraged our reach to include the mobile apps of many of our news agency partners, including Agence France-Presse, Associated Press, Canwest and more.  Business Wire provides anywhere, anytime, up-to-the-minute access in multiple languages via a choice of mobile platforms.  This is just another example of how we have embraced the latest technologies to address the shifting work habits of the on-the-go professional and retail investor — and to make information easily available to all market participants.

Business Wire has also integrated social media and search engine optimization into every distribution, exponentially heightening the online profile of each release.  Our advanced metrics provide clients with valuable statistical usage data and online posting reports.  Yes, it really is all about pickup; the more eyeballs, the more pickup — which is the start of the engagement process.  In our business, less is definitely not more.

We live by the Warren Buffett quote: Price is what you pay, value is what you get.  Our mantra is to continually increase the value we provide for our members.  As we approach our 50th anniversary, our motivation and commitment is to continue to be the best that we can be.  Our passion is to be the industry’s technology leader, and to offer the most innovative and enterprising products and services.  And we are equally passionate about our clients, who have trusted us with their important news for nearly a half-century.  Our goal is to continue to exceed their expectations.

While Business Wire has continuously evolved with bleeding edge technology, the technology exists to build upon our core business principles: to always provide the gold standard in disclosure and global news dissemination.

Stay tuned……the best is yet to come.


Business Wire’s Preliminary Comments on SEC Disclosure Vote

August 1, 2008

We know there has been much discussion in the past day with regards to the SEC’s statement on websites and disclosure. Our press release issued today indicates that before we can issue a detailed response, we are waiting until the SEC’s interpretive guidance is issued.

However, we continue to maintain that simply posting material news on a corporate web site or using blogs does not meet the spirit and intent of Regulation FD because it is neither simultaneous, nor full and fair. It is Business Wire’s belief that this is not what the SEC intended.

As we have stated in the past, the use of web sites as an ancillary means of news dissemination is, in our view, a best practice. However, web posting or blogs alone are not a substitute for secure and simultaneous push delivery of material news to the disclosure media, financial markets, online web portals, aggregators, and the global investing public. Neither does it accomplish the requirements of the major stock exchanges.


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