Business Wire 2014 Media Survey Wins Top MarCom Award

November 17, 2014

By Serena Ehrlich, Director of Social and Evolving Media

Last week, the winners of the 2014 International MarCom Awards were announced on http://marcomawards.com. Business Wire is pleased to announce receipt of the Platinum-level selection in the Writing/White Paper category for the 2014 Business Wire Media Survey Results.

The MarCom Awards are a creative competition for marketing and communication professionals, organized by the Association of Marketing and Communication Professionals (AMCP), http://amcpros.com. Entries are gathered from corporations, advertising agencies, public relations firms, design agencies and individual freelancers.

Business Wire 2014 Media Survey

The 21-page document, written by Business Wire’s VP of Web Communications Services, Ibrey Woodall, outlines best practices in media relations, press release distribution and online newsroom management for leading communicators. The contents of the white paper are based on results from Business Wire’s media survey of over 300 North American editors, reporters, and bloggers, and how they engage with corporate news and websites.

“This recognition emphasizes the importance of this paper to all levels of communications professionals, as well as evidence of Business Wire’s close connection to the media,” said Woodall.
The award-winning paper, selected from over 6,500 global entries, reflects on how today’s reporters continue to rely on press releases distributed by newswires, as well as company online newsrooms for supporting information and press materials.

Click here to download a copy of the 2014 Business Wire Media Survey Results white paper: http://go.businesswire.com/business-wire-media-survey-results

Click here to read more about how to implement best practices in media relations and online newsroom development:


Business Wire Promotes 3 Top Media Relations Experts: Raschanda Hall, Pilar Portela and Matthew Allinson

November 13, 2014

By Serena Ehrlich, Director of Social and Evolving Media

Earlier today, Business Wire announced the promotions of three media relations experts, Raschanda Hall, Director of Global Media Relations, Pilar Portela, Media Relations Manager, U.S., and Matthew Allinson, Media Relations Manager, International.  Business Wire has the most media relations experts in the newswire industry.  Each day, this team works with large and small media outlets across the globe to ensure the widest visibility and usage of our client’s press releases.

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Meet Raschanda

Raschanda has spent the last 14 years leading Business Wire’s global media relations team through the fast-paced, changing media landscape, utilizing her formidable communication skills, understanding of emerging technology, and pioneering social media presence to expand Business Wire’s reach to media and influencers worldwide. Raschanda’s focus is on strategies to further establish and expand Business Wire’s circuit offerings and targeted delivery using the latest technology and communications tools. Her work provides Business Wire the advantage in reaching both traditional, online, trade and specialty press and social media audiences around the world.

Raschanda is an active member of many journalism and PR industry organizations including the Online News Association, the National Association of Black Journalists, the Publicity Club of Chicago, ColorComm and the National Black Public Relations Society where she serves as Vice President of the Chicago chapter.  She is based in Chicago and is a graduate of Dillard University in New Orleans. You can follow Raschanda on Twitter at @RaschandaHall.

PilarMeet Pilar

Pilar has been with Business Wire for 18 years and joined the Media Relations department 6 years ago.  In her current role, she oversees the U.S. Media Relations team and is responsible for developing, maintaining, and expanding relationships with the Southeast and Multicultural media, especially U.S. Hispanic. In recent years, she has been a key player in developing Business Wire’s LatinoWire circuits, speaking on industry panels and cultivating relationships with Hispanic journalists and media properties.

Pilar is an active member of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists where she has served as Officer At Large for 4 years. Based in Miami, Pilar is a graduate of New York University (NYU) with a Bachelor’s degree in Journalism and Florida Atlantic University (FAU) where she earned an MBA.

Matt 1Meet Matt

Matt has spent the past 12 years in various roles within Business Wire’s International Media Relations Department. He has endeavored to enhance Business Wire’s global reach by coordinating licensing agreements, developing partnerships with international news outlets, cultivating relationships with journalists in all corners of the globe, and directing a staff of media relations professionals in Canada, Europe, and Asia. Matt is also an active member of the Western Washington chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and regularly organizes media events in the Pacific Northwest.

Originally from Colorado, Matt has spent the past 4years in Seattle. He has a degree in Journalism & Mass Communication from the University of Colorado and a certificate in Social Media Implementation from the University of Washington.

Business Wire’s media relations team covers the world from Business Wire offices in New York, San Francisco, Miami, Chicago, Washington, D.C., Boston, Los Angeles, Toronto, Paris, Frankfurt and Tokyo.


Case Study: Utilizing Press Releases to Reach Canadian Media and Consumers

October 14, 2014

Earlier this month, Business Wire spoke with HOOPP, Healthcare of Ontario Pension Plan about their use of press releases.  In this CommPro podcast, Martin Biefer, the Director of Public Affairs at HOOPP to discuss HOOPP’s press release success story and his opinions on how to rise above the news clutter.

In just 8 minutes, learn how a single press release caught the attention of an entire country.  Click here to read the article http://www.commpro.biz/public-relations/media-relations/wire/ or watch the video below.


New FREE Service, Expert Latinos, Helps Connect Hispanic Reporters with Sources

September 23, 2014

In an age where Hispanic media outlets are understaffed and reporters are on tight deadlines—in comes a new free service called Expert Latinos. Expert Latinos was created to help Hispanic reporters find sources and experts for their stories, saving them time and energy.

The way it works is very simple. Basically the reporter fills out a quick form directly on the website (ExpertLatinos.com) detailing what they are looking for. The request is then sent via a daily email to the list of subscribers, which consists of experts, entrepreneurs, public relation professionals and much more.  As a subscriber, if you see a story in which you can contribute to, you then simply reply directly to the reporter via email.

ExpertLatinos

Launched in April 2014, Expert Latinos has quickly become the go-to-source for Hispanic media outlets looking to quickly identify experts and sources. Among the media outlets already using Expert Latinos includes reporters and writers for: Univision, Telemundo, La Opinion, EFE America, Yahoo! Mujer, Vista Magazine, El Diario/La Prensa…the list goes on and on.

Reporters are submitting queries for just about anything from “I’m working on a story on the future of Spanish in the U.S. and need an expert in linguistics” to “I’m currently working on an article and need to interview entrepreneurs to talk about the best tools to grow their business.” Best of all, it’s completely free for reporters and sources alike.

So if you’re a source or expert and are looking to promote your business and get free exposure you can sign up here. Stay on top of the daily email alerts because you never know when something might come up where you might be the perfect fit. Simply reply back to the reporter via the email they provided.

If you’re a journalist and are looking for an expert or source for an upcoming story you can start submitting your request here. Reporters can also chose to send their queries anonymously, in which case their outlet and email will not be disclosed.  Expert Latinos will then receive the responses and forward them to the reporter.

So what are you waiting for?  Sign up today!


Global Relations Has Changed – The Shift from Information to Participation

September 22, 2014

This year’s Global Media Forum held in Bonn, Germany launched a new shift in thinking for today’s media outlets.

Historically, relationships between media and companies have been about information sharing.  Companies write press releases, media outlets write coverage based on that information.  But this has changed.  In 2014, news sharing is shifting from learning by reading, to learning via participation.

Read this piece by Business Wire Germany’s Senior International Media Relations Specialist Kai Prager to learn more about this shift, and what changed the way Europeans think about media, news and news sharing in 2014.

http://www.commpro.biz/public-relations/media-relations/global-media-trends-shifting-information-participation/


Survey says? Reporters want breaking company news and photos!

September 10, 2014

In this analysis of the 2014 Business Wire media survey, Ibrey Woodall, Business Wire’s VP of web services, takes a deeper look at the types of multimedia elements most preferred by today’s reporters.

bizwirepressreleaseprefs

Not only do we cover the 7 types of news reporters want to see in a press release, we discuss what supporting assets work the best. As we move into a more visual, interactive world, text-only press releases are becoming increasingly rare.  Reporters are using images to round out their story and if you are not providing one, your competitor may be.

bizwiremultimedia

Take a few minutes and read this CommPro.biz piece to learn which types of multimedia reporters need and why:  http://www.commpro.biz/public-relations/media-relations/media-favor-photographs-press-releases-2014-business-wire-survey-provides-journalist-feedback-todays-press-release/


Eight Reasons the Media Hate You (And How You Can Fix It)

June 4, 2014
By Stephanie Jo Peksen, Account Executive, Business Wire New York

If you’re like most public relations professionals, you have a list for everything – a to-do list, a client list and, of course, a media outreach list. When time gets tight, you may occasionally succumb to the temptation to send out a blanket pitch to your entire press list, and then cross your fingers while hoping that all your clients’ dreams come true. A word of advice: don’t. The key to garnering coverage in 2014 is by helping reporters help you. Otherwise you risk landing in the junk folder – permanently.

8 Reasons the Media Hates You (And How You Can Fix it) By Stephanie Jo Peksen, Account Executive, Business Wire New YorkTo help you connect with the press who really do need your input, we compiled comments from editors, outlining the top eight reasons why reporters occasionally hate you – and how to make them love you.

1)      You Didn’t Tailor Your Pitch: “It’s hard work, but work worth doing: tailor your pitch to me. Know who I am and what I cover and exactly what might interest me about your product/person/idea other than just ‘IT EXISTS!'”  says Allen Salkin, author of From Scratch: Inside the Food Network, and freelance journalist for NY Times and other publications.

In other words, make sure you’ve at least looked at the publication and understand its audience and news stance. Are you pitching a local publication about a product launch and including a general press release and product sheet? Fine, but find an authentic local hook – don’t just say “people chew gum in New York, so your New York publication should cover our national launch of chewing gum.” There needs to be an honest connection with the reporter’s readers, and the issues covered by the media outlet – find that connection, and use it as your lede.

 

2)      Your Headline is a Snooze and Your Lede is MIA: “If the subject line of your email pitch isn’t interesting and concise, you will get deleted before you’re read. Same goes for your press release headline: if you leave the meaty stuff at the bottom, it will never get read,” says Nicole Bode, Deputy Editor of News, DNAInfo New York.

It may seem self-explanatory that brevity is the soul of wit, but we dare you to review your last few press releases or press pitches. Could you read the headline or subject aloud without the need to gasp for air? Are the most crucial details easily found within the headline/sub-head or first paragraph? If not, get cracking – and revising. Same goes for voicemails, elevator pitches and topics for short meetings.

3)      You Had Truly Bad Timing: “Not understanding a publication’s production schedule is a problem. If a magazine goes to print on Tuesday, Monday night is not the time to say ‘Ok, we’re ready to go on the record now!’” and think that you’ll make it into that issue. There are always exceptions, but they are not made with ease. Get to know the publishing schedule of a media outlet you hope to do lots of work with. It’s not an excuse to say that you waited to the last minute because you were afraid it would get out before an agreed upon date. If you think a writer or editor is that unprofessional, you shouldn’t work with them anyway,”says Xania Woodman, Senior Editor, Vegas Seven Magazine.

If you don’t know your key outlets’ timetables, start gathering them now, and act accordingly. No sending press info about a Super Bowl-related product two days before the game: No editor will have time to review and your client will be shortchanged. Similarly, unless it’s breaking news or you specifically know the editor or reporter is working that day, don’t pitch press on a major holiday. Take a break yourself – the media will respect you more if you’re not emailing them while they’re BBQing for Memorial Day or July 4th.

 

4)      You Were Too Chummy: “Among my pet peeves are publicists who address me as Mr., and others who write to me as if we know each other, when we have never before spoken or met (e.g. ‘Hi Jamie! Hope you’ve been having a great week…’ How about just ‘Dear Jamie, I represent Tazo Teas, and I would love to get to know you. I have a new product that I thought might be an excellent fit for your publication…’” says Jamie Kiffel-Alcheh, Editor-in-Chief of CarleyK.com.

A simple LinkedIn search would reveal that Ms. Kiffel-Alcheh is in fact, female, and yes, sometimes the simplest declarative introductions can be best. Does your client watch its channel’s daily segment on XYZ, and you think the client is a perfect fit for this reason? Say it clearly and professionally, and you may be surprised at the very pleasant response.

5)      You Ignored the Media’s Main Requests: “In business journalism, some publications require that I find out the revenues of a company–or they won’t accept a story from me about that firm. Every once in a while, a publicist will, after hearing this, go around me to see if they can persuade an editor at the publication to bend that rule, which will usually annoy the editor. Or they will set me up on an interview with a business owner who clearly has no intention of sharing financials, even though we’ve agreed ahead of time that this info will be part of the interview. It’s not always the publicist’s fault, but it ends up being a waste of time for all concerned, since I can’t use the interview in the end,” says Elaine Pofeldt, a contributing editor at Crain’s and a contributor to Money, Fortune and Inc. 

Reporters get frustrated when people set up follow-up interviews without all the information at the ready – so unless you are prepared to burn a bridge, don’t offer a brick wall. Pre-plan and know what information you can offer and to whom. Even if you have limited resources, come up with a Plan B. If the editor says it’s super important, believe it and get that info, or simply decline and come back another time when you have everything he or she needs to build the story. If you build a good rapport, you may wind up quoted in a trend feature or commenting on another company in print. But don’t ignore their original must-haves.

6)      You Sent a Wall of Text: “I might be different than lots of publications. I don’t want to copy/paste/print your release. I want the mechanics to find my own angle. That means links, bullets, bites. I could care less that ‘We are pleased’ was quoted by this or that important person. I agree deeply with David Meerman Scott’s jargon buzzword bingo opinion, where it seems that every solution is ‘next generation, world class, scalable, blah blah blah.’ Skip the adjectives and save me some time in finding my own angle into the story,” says Chris Brogan, Publisher of Owner Magazine, and New York Times best-selling author of six books, including The Impact Equation (with Julien Smith).

Stop calling your client “ground-breaking,” and please do take care in how you set up a press release or a pitch, with easy-to-grasp formatting, so the reporter can review it and figure out if it’s a good match. Business Wire releases are distributed in XHTML, so use bullets to focus on key points, send your release with boldface and italics to highlight issues, and make sure you include multiple relevant and easy-to-access hyperlinks. It’s not just for consumers to engage and generate click-through data for your client (although that’s a plus), but for reporters who need to know very quickly how to reach you, your client, or get more information about the product/event/issue you’re promoting. Adding a photo to your release also helps paint the clearest picture – just make sure to include a proper caption in case it’s used.

7)      You Gave Way Too MUCH information:   “You’re likely not to get any coverage if you send over so much stuff that it won’t download, or if you send a giant press release that’s too long. Simplicity works best for me. Instead of a huge file, I’d click through to see media at a link,” says Tara Cox, Managing Editor, Men’s Journal.

 

While each editor and reporter will have different needs and timetables, crashing someone’s computer with your pitch is never a good idea. Whether you’re sending a well-crafted email blast or a wire press release with well-chosen multimedia, use these digital missives to clearly show your assets and pique interest. Video, images, and multimedia are great, but make sure the links work and files are easy to open.      

 

8)      You Were Boring: “Journalists are busy and some get hundreds of press releases a day (I know I do!), so use a bit of humor in your email to me and include a story with some passion so it can really stand out. A press release can be more than a collection of data. Make me truly excited about what you’re trying to promote. If you were a reader, what story would capture YOUR attention?” says Katherine Brodsky, freelance writer for publications like Variety, Entertainment Weekly, USA Weekend, Mashable, and MovieMaker Magazine.

 

Media professionals face tight deadlines and tough demands, but the ones you hope to reach for coverage are people, not robots- they do respond to genuine feeling. Don’t forget what the R in Public Relations means and try relating and connecting for a change, and yes, add some style and interest where you can. If you can use that to establish trust and connection, and deliver on your promises, anything can happen.

 


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