Clickbait vs. News Releases: How the News Release Perseveres in a Clickbait World

February 12, 2015

By Hannah Kelly, Editor, Business Wire Paris

Clickbait is the term used to describe web content that uses sensationalist headlines in order to generate click-throughs, and often goes hand-in-hand with a lack of quality or accuracy. Clickbait manipulates the “curiosity gap,” enticing readers with an “unpredictable” story through an intriguing title that does not match the resulting story.

buzzfeed

It’s become a topical subject of late, with Ben Smith, Buzzfeed’s Editor-in-Chief announcing in November that “Buzzfeed Doesn’t Do Clickbait”, and the creation of The Onion’s satirical website, clickhole.com, almost a year ago. Readers are becoming increasingly exasperated by misleading titles and anticlimactic articles, and a backlash movement has been created. This lead to events such as Facebook declaring that it was taking measures to remove clickbait from the platform and the creation of the ingenious Twitter account @SavedYouAClick, which currently has over 187,000 followers.

So it seems the internet’s largest content creators have decided: clickbait is over.

But if this is true, why do news releases still work? Why is it, in this world of short attention spans and long titles, the news release still catches the attention of media, consumers, analysts, decision makers and more?

Simple. It’s trustworthy.

  • A news release headline will always tell you exactly what you’re about to read. Be it “Company’s Earnings up by 7%” or “Company Nominates Person as New Vice-President,” there are no surprises. The essential information is presented straight away, and the article will contain a more detailed explanation.
  • A news release will include contacts. Want to query something? Find out more information? Discuss an event? At Business Wire, the inclusion of a valid contact (verified by our team) is non-negotiable. This allows the reader, whether they are an analyst or a future customer, direct access to the right person within the company.
  • It provides additional context and content. In past years, PR professionals would have to plea to media outlets to include a link back to their company’s website. However, this is rapidly changing.  More often we now see reporters linking back to a client’s news release within their articles.  This new step allows the readers to read the factual news from the company, while they present their view within their article.
  • Arguably the most important aspect of all – publisher credibility. News releases are the origination point for any story. Reporters utilize this as source data, the raw data they need to tell a story.

So the news release lives on, victorious in its integrity and straightforwardness – and Business Wire can help you to be a part of the reputable news release collective.  Because after all, honesty is the best policy.

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Tweeting the Campaign: Three Ways Social Media is Changing the Way Reporters Cover the Election

March 5, 2012
by Shawnee Cohn, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/New York
MRT

Shawnee Cohn

Twitter CEO Dick Costolo recently proposed that 2012 is going to be the year of the “Twitter Election,” referring to the power that the social network offers presidential candidates to engage with voters.

Not only are candidates contributing to the Twitter conversation, but the media is also breaking important campaign news in 140 characters or less. Here at Business Wire, we offer all of our Public Policy and Election news at the Twitter handle @BW_PublicPolicy.

In response to this trend in news distribution, Twitter recently created an official account, @TwitterForNews, which offers tips for journalists on how to cover the 2012 election most effectively.

As part of Social Media Week, The New York Times hosted a panel discussion which delved deeper into the topic of how social media impacts political coverage. The panel featured:

The panelists offered compelling evidence for the argument that social media is critical when sending out your election-related news. Here are some highlights of how journalists utilize Twitter and other social networks:

To monitor breaking news: Stevenson stated that “every political reporter uses Twitter as a news feed all day long.” Smith agreed, admitting that he now heavily relies on Twitter traffic, in addition to some RSS news feeds, to get the day’s headlines. Instead of tuning in to watch the debates on television, one could simply scan all of the highlights by solely reading relevant tweets, noted Hamby. However, both Hamby and Stevenson advised that it is important to occasionally detach yourself from Twitter. Taking a step outside the Twitter realm helps journalists to avoid snap judgments and observe the opinions of those who are not as involved with the social network. Being that reporters rely on various mediums to get their news, it is important to send out your message on multiple platforms, such as a news wire, Twitter, mobile alerts, etc.

To accurately relay readers’ real concerns: Michel discussed how social media offers journalists the capacity to “systematically engage people” and therefore “find stories that you wouldn’t otherwise.” Smith also uses Twitter as a “place to find questions” from the public, rather than answers. Social networks allow the media to get a feel for what people are wondering about, and to consequently be more responsible to their audience, said Stevenson. For example, in the recent cases of the Komen/Planned Parenthood decision and the SOPA bill, journalists monitored the negative reactions to the policy choices on social networks and chose to report on the backlash in depth. The Washington Post places importance on reflecting “what’s happening socially,” and incorporating the “conversation around things” into their reports, says Zamora.

To interact with other political reporters:  Stevenson explained there is a “clubhouse effect” when it comes to political reporters; they tend to engage in discussion with one another and this can sometimes lead to a closed feedback loop. This creates a sort of “virtual spin room” that plays out in real-time. You can watch and learn from this ongoing conversation by following multiple political journalists (you must follow both users on Twitter to be able to see @ messages). It is also critical to establish yourself as a credible source if you are trying to gain the attention of any number of these reporters. CNN and other major media will not report anything on Twitter that they would not report on any other platform – a valid source is always essential.

For more information on Social Media Week, visit socialmediaweek.org.You can find the latest election/campaign news by registering at www.businesswire.com, or by following @BWPolitics and @BW_PublicPolicy.


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