Seek and Ye Shall Find: The News Release

March 25, 2015

By Neil Hershberg, Senior Vice President, Global Media

The primacy of the news release in the editorial ecosystem has once again been reaffirmed.Google adjusted its algorithms last September to include news releases among the authorized news sources used in gathering its “in the news” search results. Google’s decision had escaped notice until Reuters recently spotlighted the silent shift in search strategy:

Simply put, news releases may catapult other sources to earn top ranking in searches focusing on specific companies. The impact on corporate issuers, news consumers, and media organizations promises to be profound in many ways.

Sonic Earnings in Google News

Corporate issuers stand to be the major beneficiaries; companies are now able to convey their message in their own words, unfiltered and without interpretation by others. Their official statements will play a larger role in shaping subsequent conversations, based on heightened visibility.

The biggest challenge for the PR industry is to not abuse the privilege. Following rampant efforts to game the system and artificially elevate search standings, Google introduced various initiatives, i.e. “Hummingbird,” to clamp down on the outsized presence of news releases in its search results.

Google’s release rehabilitation decision provides PR and IR professionals with the opportunity for redemption.

News consumers also stand to benefit on multiple levels. Company statements are an authoritative source of information; they remain extremely popular with many audiences, including investors, product enthusiasts, and peer group professionals.

The renewed prominence of the news release provides users with a direct and simple pathway to this invaluable information resource.

“The goal of search is to get users the right answer at any one time as quickly as possible — that may mean returning an article from an established publisher or from a smaller niche publisher or indeed it might be the press release,” a Google spokeswoman told Reuters.

An unintended consequence of Google’s action is the potential diversion of traffic away from sites operated by news organizations. Industry analysts have noted that Google’s “in the news” modules are a major driver of traffic to news sites, which may see some user slippage.

The reality, however, is that most readers are anxious to get a kaleidoscope of opinions and perspectives; they will likely seek out editorial coverage from trusted third-party sources to supplement the core release.

Bottom line: the news release is more vital than ever, at the very center of the discovery process.

Business Wire NX Distribution Technology

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Google Update Emphasizes Editorial Coverage in Mobile Search Results

March 4, 2015

Last week Google started rolling out a change to mobile search results that includes a stronger emphasis on fresh news articles featuring the company, or term searched.  In this update, Google now puts the information that persuades customers the fastest right into the top half of search results.

Blog 1

The role of Mobile in the Conversion Funnel
A 2014 study from Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) Council and NetLine Corporation found that 62% of B2B buyers use mobile devices to seek out content to stay abreast of industry changes and 60% use them to find solutions to existing problems.  The IDG Global Mobile Survey 2014 shows that 86% of decision makers and executives use tablets for business-related research while 72% used mobile phones.

Given the increased reliance on mobile devices in the purchase cycle, communication and marketing professionals must be aware of how their company and content appear in search results. The better placement this material receives, the better chance for sales and marketing conversions.

The Role of Coverage in the Conversion Funnel
In 2014, Nielsen and InPowered studied how editorial coverage stacked up against other types of corporate marketing content such as branded content and user reviews. In each instance, editorial coverage showed to be more effective at increasing awareness, increasing brand affinity and purchase intent.

blog 2

Previously, Google search results looked like this image on the left. As you can see, Google included, when possible, a knowledge graph within the search results to provide a wider range of context to the search term.

Google now utilizes a carousel to present recent articles, videos and more on a particular topic. This format allows the search user to receive a wider array of more useful recent information, while the results appear in a clear, concise manner and fit within the size limitations of the device on hand.

We are excited to see additional emphasis on editorial coverage, without pushing other important search results farther down the page.  Of course, just like all Google updates, it’s key to remember that this change is still rolling out and will most likely evolve based on user search behavior, but we’ll continue to monitor and update you on changes as occur.

Google to Reintegrate Tweets Directly from Twitter in Search Results

February 5, 2015

By Serena Ehrlich, Director, Social + Evolving Media, Business Wire

Last night, Google (NASDAQ:GOOG) announced that it will be reintegrating Twitter (NYSE:TWTR) data into user search results starting in the first half of 2015 in exchange for an unspecified amount of data-licensing revenue.

This partnership will have multiple benefits for Google, Twitter, search users and corporate marketers.

In the past, Google search spiders crawled Twitter’s website, as well as Yahoo! and Bing, to bring tweets into search results, resulting in delays and missed content. This partnership will provide Google direct access to Twitter’s firehose of tweets shared by its 284 million users, therefore allowing Google to provide faster, better search results for users looking for this data.

In addition, as many news outlets report, this partnership could also eliminate the competition growing between Google and Twitter to see which company is used the most for real-time search.

Search Users
For search users, this change should provide faster, more in-depth access to Tweets utilizing their search phrases.

For Twitter, this increases the visibility and traffic to individual tweets, benefitting the platform as it looks towards increasing tweet reach outside and ad monetization.

Twitter Users
While perhaps meant as tongue in cheek, Mashable smartly notes this new Google/Twitter integration could increase the length of time a tweet is visible in search, a benefit and a negative to “trigger-happy” users.

Unfortunately, while this agreement provides, faster, direct access to tweets, we have yet to see how Google will weigh and integrate tweets into its search results.  Will they be shown as individual results or combined as is the format now with news articles?  Or will they stand alone, filling search screens with individual messages.  Will weight of the search depend on verified badges or will each tweet have the same amount of “Google Juice?”

We are so excited to see these types of content partnerships take place. Business Wire has been providing access to our clients’ news releases across Google and Twitter for many years now and we look forward to seeing how this new partnership will amplify your content.

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Discovery, Not Link Building, is the Objective of Your Press Release

August 1, 2013
by Fred Godlash, Marketing Specialist, Business Wire/LA
and John Leung, SEO/SEM Specialist, Business Wire/SF

Although it may seem like PR101, it should be clearly stated that a press release is an effective way of engaging targeted audiences by having influential media outlets, social advocates and consumers discover your story. It is after the discovery process that you gain what is referred to as “earned media”– meaning publicity is attained, not purchased, from promotional efforts rather than advertising.

This point was recently brought up in response to Google taking a hard stance against embedding anchor text in press releases in order to gain PageRank. How they relate to press releases are as follows:

  • Press releases will be treated as a paid placement by Google.
  • Optimized anchor text links in a press release distribution will be considered “unnatural” and will not pass PageRank in Google search results.

What this means is that Google is stopping unnatural link building from press release distribution. The search engine leader is attempting to give the user the best experience possible and the latest algorithm update will look for “link schemes” used to manipulate search results. John Mueller, one of Google’s lead Webmaster Trends Analysts, talked in a recent video hangout about the way Google will look at press releases. Mueller said, “When [press release issuers create a link to] themselves we do not consider that natural. Promoting is perfectly fine but it is not considered a natural link. We are looking for an external person to say, ‘I am recommending this website or article.’”

Press Release Links Misunderstood

Press releases can generate natural links that can help add ranking to your company, but there is a misconception on how this is achieved. A poorly written press release that is blindly spammed to the masses does not have any authority to garner any links and will be ignored. In contrast, a well-conceived release that has a unique voice can get coverage from news organizations, can be shared over social outlets, and can generate plenty of links that are third-party votes of confidence that the message was newsworthy. In other words, it is not only the press release distribution system that is generating the links, but the results of your PR efforts.

For example, if the Associated Press picked up your press release and did a national story, you would not gain links simply from having your story on AP, but from the subsequent results of that story. The benefit happens when millions of readers discover your story and engage with your company or brand. They may choose to link to you or share that information on their social networks.

The true value in distributing a targeted release via the wire is not simply to gain links, but the influence, brand awareness and reputation you gain when you distribute your press release so widely that it is found and shared in various media or social outlets worldwide.

What is Business Wire Doing About the Latest Algorithm Change?

Google Webmaster Tools says that to prevent PageRank from passing on anchor links within a press release you can do one of the following:

  • Add a rel=”nofollow” attribute to the <a> tag.
  • Redirect the links to an intermediate page that is blocked from search engines with a robots.txt file.

When you use Business Wire, we do all of this on your behalf to ensure that your releases get the most online visibility and ranking benefit from our vast distribution network worldwide.

Business Wire uses the “Google-approved” method for carrying links when we activate what we refer to as “smartlinks” in a customer’s press release. By redirecting the anchor links in all press releases carried on our network, and by adhering to Google best practices when distributing a press release to news outlets, financial markets, disclosure systems, investors, information web sites, databases, social influencers and other audiences, we represent authority as a reputable service that has been distributing press releases since 1961. We simply will not publish press releases that are not in accordance with Business Wire’s policies and procedures.

When considering the latest and constantly evolving changes from Google, it is always good practice to simply focus on writing a thought-provoking newsworthy press release which incorporates meaningful, relevant links. This will ensure that your release will create genuine interest and attract influential media outlets and influencers to engage with your content. Don’t overthink the SEO aspect, but rather concentrate on original, engaging, shareable content using the best distribution possible to reach your audience.

Editor’s Corner: Best Practices for Using Links in Press Releases

March 21, 2012

by Sera Gonzalez, Senior Editor, Business Wire Dallas

by Sera Gonzalez, Senior Editor, Business Wire Dallas

With the advent of XHTML, additional knowledge is only a click away. Embedded hyperlinks turn ordinary text into doorways of information. Business Wire tracks link click-throughs, showing the link text, URL, which version of the release and how many total clicks it has received.

As an editor, I’ve seen releases with no links at all, making it difficult for readers to easily find more information. I’ve also seen releases so full of links it was impossible to determine what information was important. Finding a balance and knowing how to optimize link usage is vital for press release writers.

When considering hyperlinks in text, the writer has two options: the URL and anchor text.

A URL in the text is like this:, which works well for short URLs and at the end of boilers, linking to company home pages. Though most of the internet is XHTML compatible, there are a few sites that still post in plain-text. In these instances, a link will not be active in the body unless it is written out. Instead of saying, “Click here,” say, “Visit” Full URL links are also useful when linking to social media sites: and Readers see your handle and can type it in if they already have those web sites open. Registration URLs for conference calls, webcasts and trade shows help a reader easily keep the link for future use or send to colleagues.

Sometimes URLs for frequently shared pages can be really long and should be hidden from readers. These cases call for anchor text, like Business Wire, instead of writing out the URL. These links are like the icing in your release; leading your reader to more information. For names in releases, an anchor text link to the person’s biography – which commonly includes a photo – works perfectly. You also can use anchor text in product announcements, referencing a page with videos, photos, reviews or purchasing information. Anchor text links also boost SEO for your release. For example, if you wanted your release to rank on Google for the keyword “Business Wire,” you would make sure that phrase appears in the headline, first paragraph and as anchor text, Business Wire.

Make hyperlinks work for you. Lead your reader to places beyond your release, to further the understanding of your product, personnel and company. Also keep in mind that not everything needs a hyperlink; too many and your release can look like spam and discourage readers. The link is yours.

With 31 bureaus around the world and more newsrooms than all of our competitors combined, Business Wire is proud to provide local expertise and superior service, backed by the most accurate editors in the world. In Editor’s Corner, we ask some of our best to chime in on how to get the most out of your press release, based on their years of experience in the industry.

PRSAIcon 2011 Recap: Eight Key Takeaways, From Storytelling to Link Tracking

October 19, 2011

by Amy Yen, Marketing Specialist, Business Wire Los Angeles

Business Wire at PRSAIcon 2011This week, Business Wire was once again a proud sponsor and exhibitor at the 2011 PRSA International Conference, aka #PRSAIcon. Our conference team had a great time meeting so many of our amazing clients in person and learning the latest about the always changing PR industry. We tweeted updates on our @businesswire feed throughout the conference of interesting lessons from many of the keynotes and sessions. Here are eight key takeaways:

  1. PR is about storytelling. It was only appropriate in Orlando, home to the most magical place on earth, that the unofficial theme of the conference was storytelling. Opening keynote speaker Soledad O’Brien of CNN talked about storytelling being more than a statistic. You have to find the character behind the statistic & tell the story with their passion. The closing keynote speaker, Joe Rohde from Disney, talked about compelling stories coming from the interruptions in expected patterns. “We don’t have time for things we think we already know.”
  2. Video and visuals make for compelling storytelling. YouTube is the number two search engine in the world behind Google. Video makes for great content and is not as expensive as it’s perceived to be. (After all, every phone is a camera.) It’s also a good idea to get your executives on video talking about your brand . . . it helps qualify them as spokespeople for journalists.
  3. Customer service is the new black. Like it or not, part of PR is now customer service. In fact, thanks to social media, PR people are often the first to hear about the problems. There is still a level of awe right now if you just reply when your customers try to talk to you.
  4. Media training is not just a C-suite sport anymore. Keynote speaker Chris Brogan talked about how everyone is on some kind of media these days, so everyone should be trained. Soledad O’Brien discussed media training from a journalist’s perspective, saying passion and emotion can’t be trained. Ultimately, what people relate to is the authenticity and passion behind the messaging points.
  5. You can’t ignore Google+. Chris Brogan pointed out that you have to care about Google+, if only because it’s the only social network currently being indexed on the top two search engines in the world. Every PR professional should at least be conversational about it. Additionally, Google+ profiles can help with personal online presence since it ranks so highly on Google. Optimize your title and introduction and include links to all your other sites and networks, as those appear in your search results.
  6. Empower your employees on social media. If you’re terrified to give control to others in your organization, you will not be successful in social media. Train them and have a social media policy so you can be. Your policy should be short and understandable without legal assistance and should be in every new hire’s packet when they start.
  7. If it can be searched for, it can be optimized. Keyword optimize your blog posts, landing pages, press releases, online newsrooms, multimedia and social content. In press releases, optimize in the headline and subhead, include links and a call-to-action. For photos and other multimedia, optimize the file name of the file you are uploading, include alt text and captions.
  8. We are all fighting for budgets. PR should get credit for the leads it generates. Set goals before your campaign so you can track conversions with tools like Google Analytics. Track traffic with tools like Google URL builder, which tags your URLs so you know where your link clicks are coming from (press release versus AdWords versus Facebook ads, etc).

At the conference, we also announced our new partnership with Critical Mention, which will provide clients with access to Critical Mention’s real-time television and radio monitoring platform. As an introductory promotion, Business Wire clients who subscribe with Critical Mention for 2012 will receive the remainder of 2011 at no charge.

We’d also like to congratulate Elizabeth Rowland at Strat-igence, who was the winner of our iPad Giveaway. And thanks again to PRSA, the speakers and all the attendees for a great conference!

Tips for Effective Searching: Knowing your Defaults Results in Better Google Search Engine Results

October 13, 2011

by Sandy Malloy, Senior Information Specialist

Sandy Malloy, Senior Information SpecialistIn our recent post on free tools for monitoring your press releases, we encouraged users to revisit their Google Alerts settings.  This valuable service was established years ago.  Lots of us signed up then and have never looked back.  We hope you’ve updated your alert settings and are getting better results after a quick check-up.

The same is true for ad hoc searching.  Nonchalant typing of a phrase into the Google search box can be tempting, but a few thoughtful tips can help you get the most out of the search experience.  Here’s a few to get you started.

1)  Know your defaults.  It’s good to know your faults, but when it comes to searching, it’s even more important to know your defaults. Many of these can be changed to improve results.

For example, a search on Google Web ( defaults to “everything.”   Sounds comprehensive, right?

Not necessarily.  An automatic blanket search can have drawbacks.   The information you are seeking often gets buried beneath higher-ranking but irrelevant pages.  You  may be better served searching individual Google content areas such as news, images  or Web separately.  Also, try Advanced Search (discussed below).

The order in which results are displayed can also affect your results.  The default sort order is “relevance.”  This type of sorting  works great for non-news websites.  For news, sorting by date is often better.

Unless you specify otherwise, Google will suppress apparent duplicate content.  Again, for some types of searches, that’s fine.  If you want to find a company’s website, it’s usually the first result on the page and you don’t need anything else.  Or you may want to know that a piece of news appeared and don’t care which version of the story you see.  But what if you want to see how widely that story was disseminated?  Google will show you one version of the story unless you override duplicate suppression.

2)  Searching for exact phrases is a common strategy, but did you know you can use quotes around your phrase or dashes between the words for exact matches?

If you don’t, Google will search that combination of words in any order and not necessarily next to one another.  That can result in weird returns such as this recent search for stories about Fire Prevention Week.

I added no quotes or dashes. The third result: “The State Police forensic team, State Fire Prevention and Control, A week after the fire, owners Mike and Jim Frazee said they plan to rebuild their .…”

For common combinations of words (e.g., “Barack Obama”) it’s not that critical to be more specific.  But combinations of common words can spit out irrelevant results that nevertheless rank high because all the words are present.

3)  Make Advanced Search your friend.  It will allow you to put in phrases without worrying about the format (see #2 above), combine words and phrases (hint:  a phrase using a dash, e.g. fire-prevention-week, can be used as a “word” in the advanced search form) and even allow you to narrow your search using other parameters such as source name or domain.  The domain option in Google Web is a great way to find information from non-commercial sources.  For instance, you can find health-related information coming from educational (.edu) or government (.gov) sources, or nonprofits (.org)  In News, I like to specify my time frame as well.


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