LatinoWire Webinar News Conference: US Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis on “The State of the Latino Worker in the US”

August 30, 2012

Today, as part of LatinoWire’s Expert Webinar Series, US Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis spoke about The State of the Latino Worker in the US.  Her presentation addressed a variety of topics, including the role of Latino workers in the ongoing economic recovery, the administration’s investments in job training and labor law enforcement, and projections on the future contributions of Latinos to the American workforce.

Sec. of Labor Hilda Solis

US Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis
(click for a downloadable, high-resolution version of this photo)

If you missed this event, you can view the entire recorded webinar here, or view the Secretary’s presentation and download her prepared remarks below:

Additional links:


Free Webinar with US Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis on the State of Latino Workers

August 22, 2012
U.S. Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis

U.S. Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis

On Thursday, Aug. 30, in advance of Labor Day, Business Wire will host a free webinar with US Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis, the first Latina to head a major federal agency in a president’s cabinet, to discuss the state of the Latino worker in the United States.

Secretary Solis will discuss the gains that Latinos have made during the economic recovery; specific sectors of growth and opportunities; challenges and prospects for women, veterans and youth; vulnerable workers; and department efforts in worker training and education for the Latino community.

This event is FREE for all attendees. The webinar will be moderated by Danny Selnick, Vice President, LatinoWire & Public Policy Services, Business Wire/DC; and Pilar Portela, Media Relations Supervisor, Business Wire/Miami.

To register, please visit: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/559226112

NOTE: Q&A session open to to the public, but questions are limited to working journalists.  Reporters must identify themselves and their news organizations when submitting written questions during the webinar. Questions may be submitted ahead of time to danny.selnick@businesswire.com


Covering Your Bases on The Big Issues This Election Season

May 25, 2012

by Danny Selnick, VP, Public Policy Services

by Danny Selnick, Vice President of Public Policy Services, Business Wire DC

The upcoming presidential election and national political conventions are looking to be a contentious time.  No doubt this will be an interesting election cycle where also the entire House of Representatives is up for grabs, as is nearly one-third the Senate.

So will the president (incumbent or newly elected) have a Congressional majority that can push along and support legislation that’s near and dear to him? Or will the country have a divided Congress that will keep it in political gridlock? The stakes are huge with political and economic and even global ramifications. Not even the pundits can agree. But one thing’s for sure, professional communicators with some interest in the outcomes will need to get the word out. The question is, with what strategy?

No longer can public affairs communicators rely solely on getting their message out to traditional media. They must also reach out to grass-roots supporters, influentials and voters by using social media — and use it effectively in creating powerful networks and communities. Additionally, communicators must use powerful search engine optimization tools to make sure their news is seen.

Let’s not also forget that the United States Supreme Court will be handing down its decision on the constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Should the Court let the Act remain as is, not much will change and the law that was enacted two years ago will continue to be implemented. There will be those organizations and state governments that will remain opposed, but they’ll have to abide by the ruling. However, should the Court rule against the Act, no one really knows what will happen. Dismantling what has already been in effect will not be easy, and the Republican Leadership (including Mr. Romney, as well as those even at the state level) will have to come through on their promise of a better plan.

In sum, public affairs/corporate communicators and government relations professionals should be working on their messaging and thinking about the tactics to reaching all their key audiences. One more very important point to mention is that the American public (and voters) is not homogeneous. Far from it. Communicators need to remember to include messaging to the Hispanic community (that has been growing in numbers, power and importance) as well as to African-American, Asian-American and other groups.

Selnick is Business Wire’s Vice President for Public Policy and LatinoWire Services and developed specialty targeted services that are designed to reach any organization’s key audiences — from the media to decision-makers … to getting your message in front of the public that goes online looking for news.  The Public Policy Wire also includes Issues-Focused Lists that reach beat reporters by personalized email — including Health Care and Presidential Campaign.


Tweeting the Campaign: Three Ways Social Media is Changing the Way Reporters Cover the Election

March 5, 2012
by Shawnee Cohn, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/New York
MRT

Shawnee Cohn

Twitter CEO Dick Costolo recently proposed that 2012 is going to be the year of the “Twitter Election,” referring to the power that the social network offers presidential candidates to engage with voters.

Not only are candidates contributing to the Twitter conversation, but the media is also breaking important campaign news in 140 characters or less. Here at Business Wire, we offer all of our Public Policy and Election news at the Twitter handle @BW_PublicPolicy.

In response to this trend in news distribution, Twitter recently created an official account, @TwitterForNews, which offers tips for journalists on how to cover the 2012 election most effectively.

As part of Social Media Week, The New York Times hosted a panel discussion which delved deeper into the topic of how social media impacts political coverage. The panel featured:

The panelists offered compelling evidence for the argument that social media is critical when sending out your election-related news. Here are some highlights of how journalists utilize Twitter and other social networks:

To monitor breaking news: Stevenson stated that “every political reporter uses Twitter as a news feed all day long.” Smith agreed, admitting that he now heavily relies on Twitter traffic, in addition to some RSS news feeds, to get the day’s headlines. Instead of tuning in to watch the debates on television, one could simply scan all of the highlights by solely reading relevant tweets, noted Hamby. However, both Hamby and Stevenson advised that it is important to occasionally detach yourself from Twitter. Taking a step outside the Twitter realm helps journalists to avoid snap judgments and observe the opinions of those who are not as involved with the social network. Being that reporters rely on various mediums to get their news, it is important to send out your message on multiple platforms, such as a news wire, Twitter, mobile alerts, etc.

To accurately relay readers’ real concerns: Michel discussed how social media offers journalists the capacity to “systematically engage people” and therefore “find stories that you wouldn’t otherwise.” Smith also uses Twitter as a “place to find questions” from the public, rather than answers. Social networks allow the media to get a feel for what people are wondering about, and to consequently be more responsible to their audience, said Stevenson. For example, in the recent cases of the Komen/Planned Parenthood decision and the SOPA bill, journalists monitored the negative reactions to the policy choices on social networks and chose to report on the backlash in depth. The Washington Post places importance on reflecting “what’s happening socially,” and incorporating the “conversation around things” into their reports, says Zamora.

To interact with other political reporters:  Stevenson explained there is a “clubhouse effect” when it comes to political reporters; they tend to engage in discussion with one another and this can sometimes lead to a closed feedback loop. This creates a sort of “virtual spin room” that plays out in real-time. You can watch and learn from this ongoing conversation by following multiple political journalists (you must follow both users on Twitter to be able to see @ messages). It is also critical to establish yourself as a credible source if you are trying to gain the attention of any number of these reporters. CNN and other major media will not report anything on Twitter that they would not report on any other platform – a valid source is always essential.

For more information on Social Media Week, visit socialmediaweek.org.You can find the latest election/campaign news by registering at www.businesswire.com, or by following @BWPolitics and @BW_PublicPolicy.


Communicating Effectively to U.S. Spanish-Language Media & the Hispanic Community: More Than Sending Your News in Spanish

February 24, 2012

by Danny Selnick, Vice President of Public Policy & LatinoWire Services, Business Wire DC

by Danny Selnick, VP, LatinoWire Services

Communicators that may have only the occasional need to engage with the Hispanic media and community about an issue, product or some other topic, should take note of a few useful tips for their targeted communications outreach or run the risk of failure.

  • First, the Hispanic community is not monolithic.  They come to the United States from all corners of the Americas, and there are cultural and language differences that need to be addressed, especially when crafting the message and then writing the news release.   While I’m not suggesting communicators write many versions of the same release to fit all the various communities, I am saying that the message has to be general enough that Hispanic media and their audiences can equally relate to the message.
  • Second, simply translating releases into Spanish can be dangerousdestroying the message or even worse – a loss of reputation, as an extreme example.  Spanish is a language that is culturally rich and anyone doing translations needs to completely understand the interaction between words and culture to ensure the message is well-received and understood.  Gerald Erichsen wrote an article in About.com listing several well-known (true and not-so-true) Spanish translation/cultural blunders.  Nevertheless, the point is clear: Don’t use an automated program to translate your news from English into Spanish … and if you need to translate, make sure the person is a native speaker.  Oh, and also remember that Spanish doesn’t come in one flavor.  Words used in one country might mean something very different in another.  Use generally accepted and grammatically correct Spanish.
  •  Third, while many recent immigrants or older Hispanics may only speak Spanish and rely on traditional Spanish-language print and broadcast media for news and information, younger Hispanics tend to be bilingual and look for and read news also in English – both in print and online.  And much like other American in their 20′s and 30′s, younger Hispanics are increasingly online, using smart devices with mobile news and social media apps to be informed and stay connected.  That also means communicators should include social media strategies while employing the latest technologies in search engine optimization and add multimedia when appropriate.  Make your news release powerful and visible.
  • Last (but not no less important), which Spanish-language media should you consider reaching out to?  Just like any other communications campaign to media, you should target your message to Hispanic media appropriately.  Is your story national, regional, local?  Researching and finding sources of up-to-date listings of Spanish-language newsrooms is not as easy as finding general consumer newspapers by circulation from E&P.  Using Google or other search engines may offer a number of links – but they’re not likely to be accurate.  Some even at the top of the search (like Echo Media) are more than seven years old.  You can go to Business Wire’s LatinoWire page for some 1,200 listings organized by media type and geography.  Also keep in mind that there are really only abut 30 Spanish-language dailies in the United States.  Most print publications are weeklies, so be mindful of their deadlines.  Reaching bloggers and social media feeds takes a bit more work too.  You have to find appropriate writers, communities and feeds — and then build connections.  See who is following whom and ask if they’re appropriate for your own network.  If so, link-in, befriend and follow them.  Your network will also grow.

So what’s the end result?  Issue your news with care, in Spanish and in English, to traditional Hispanic and general media, but also include reach to the online world by keeping up with and using new the mediums of communications used your audiences.

Danny Selnick, a 25-year veteran of the newswire business, is Business Wire’s vice president for LatinoWire and Public Policy.  He is based in Washington, D.C.


Don’t Forget Who is Also Interested in Your News — Congress and Wall Street

January 30, 2012
by Danny Selnick, Vice President, Public Policy Services, Business Wire DC

by Danny Selnick, VP, Public Policy Services

Did you ever think that your earnings or hiring news might really be of interest to members of Congress?  Well they are.  When a company has positive earnings or announces expansion plans,  it may tie into job stability and growth — not just at the company, but across the particular states where the company has operations.  Members of Congress want to know about news back home — what’s affecting their constituents.  After all, they’re voters.

But staffers on the Hill aren’t personally reading through the massive amounts of news coming into their information services.  Instead, they are more likely to have filters with keywords that automatically pull out stories of interest.  So, make sure you consider how your news is likely to be searched by public affairs audiences when crafting content.  Keywords typically used by elected officials in tracking news include his or her name, the district (city) they represent, or a particular issues they’re involved with.

So if a news item mentions  Cleveland, OH, for example, it’s a good bet that Dennis Kucinich’s office (and others representing Cleveland) will see the story.  It could even become part of their news summary or daily news briefing.  Same for the Senate as well.  Because not all news releases contain good news, Hill staff need to know about that too … who knows how they might be able to help?  And now with the economy all about jobs and the hope it will improve, these news items are more important than ever.

What about news from advocacy organizations?  Did you ever think your issues based news would be of importance to industry analysts on Wall Street?  Your news can play a role in the ratings of companies and industries analysts follow.  Analysts do more than go over financials, read news releases, visit plants and hold conference calls and meeting with corporate leaders.  They’re looking for news that will have an affect on companies and industries they cover.  Issues-focused news from advocacy organizations can have an impact — if the issue is big enough.

Like members on the Hill, analysts have a plethora of news feeds to keep abreast of what’s happening.  So if you’re trying to make a point about some legislation, don’t forget to get your news to those covering Wall Street.

Whether you’re an advocacy group, association, non-profit, union, government agency or corporation, if you have important issues-focused news, Business Wire’s Public Policy Wire can help you deliver it to the decision-makers, influencers and media you need to reach most.


Business Wire’s Danny Selnick Books Congresswoman Michele Bachmann for National Press Club Event

August 4, 2011

What’s it like to sit on the dais with Minnesota Congresswoman and candidate for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination, Michele Bachmann?

Ask Business Wire’s VP of Public Policy Danny Selnick, who was Bachmann’s lunch partner onstage at a recent National Press Club luncheon.    Selnick serves on the NPC’s Luncheon Speakers’ Committee and booked Congresswoman Bachmann as a speaker.

About 300 attended the Press Club event, hosted by NPC President Mark Hamrick. In addition to the Congresswoman and her guests, some of the most well-known print and broadcast reporters in journalism today–including Christine Amanpour and representatives from Fox News, Time and CNN–were seated at the head table.

Here’s Selnick’s take on the controversial Congresswoman from the vantage point of the head table.

“As the event organizer I sat next to the Congresswoman during the lunch portion of the event and had an opportunity to get to know her a bit. Politics aside, she is an incredibly warm and friendly woman who seemed to take a genuine interest in what I said about my family, job and magic as my hobby.  (I promised to spare her and everyone in the room any tricks).

“Congresswoman Bachmann talked about her values, her campaign platform and  her steadfast opposition to any debt-limit plan that failed to revamp federal spending.

In the end, she thanked me and the National Press Club for the invitation and seemed eager to face the dozens of cameras representing all the news networks, as well as print and radio journalists also in attendance.

“Later on that evening, my wife and two girls watched the webcast and my 10-year old commented how unimpressed she was seeing me up at the head table.  ‘Dad, what did you do, but sit there?’

” But I could tell she really was proud of me when I got a big hug right afterwards.”

Nice work, Danny!


Reaching Public Policy Audiences: Choosing the Right Words & Platforms

November 24, 2010

by Danny Selnick, Vice President, Public Policy Services, Business Wire DC

BW VP of Public Policy Services Danny Selnick

November’s mid-term elections are over and voters and pundits can talk ad infinitum about who’s in, who’s out, and why — and even what challenges President Obama and his administration face because of the shift in power in the House and a narrowing of the margin for Democrats in the Senate.

We’re sure to see Republicans (and Tea-Party members) try to overturn sections of the recently passed Healthcare Reform Bill.  There’s also talk of repealing recently passed financial and oil industry regulations.  Then there’s the issue of keeping or repealing the “Bush Era Tax Cuts,” the need to balance the federal budget, and free trade — all against the backdrop of creating jobs and getting the economy working again.  Still on the long list of agenda items for Congress and the Administration are education and energy reform.  One thing’s for sure: there will be no shortage of important issues coming up over the next two years.

With “divided government” the new reality in Washington, organizations need to develop a coherent communications strategy to begin building support for “what’s near and dear to them” in advance of when their issue comes up for discussion.  In some cases (like the expected attempt to dismantle parts of the Healthcare Reform Bill) an issue may be “push-started or stalled” at the state level.  Communicators must get their message out not just to media, but also to decision-makers — and perhaps even more importantly, to the voting public directly in order to engage and mobilize support at a grassroots level.  That’s especially true because, as shown in this last three election cycles, the court of public opinion (and voting behavior) is highly fluid.

Public affairs communicators are faced with a variety of challenges as to how they can effectively get their news into the hands of all their intended audiences.  Engaging online audiences, from journalists to activists, helps boost visibility and credibility.  But, first you have to learn and analyze the most popular terms and keywords used to frame issues in media coverage, social media conversations and online searches.  This information can help guide you in writing press releases and other online communications that improves search engine optimization (SEO).

For example, there aren’t universally agreed upon terms to define many of our nation’s debates (one person’s Obamacare is another person’s landmark healthcare legislation), so knowing and researching those terms and their weighted influence on audiences is critical to communications outreach — affecting how your news is seen and viewed and by whom.  A number of free keyword analysis tools are available, and Business Wire experts have written a number of blog posts that detail SEO tips for press releases.

Once you’ve crafted a well-written press release with relevant keywords (and modified landing pages with matching terms), it’s crucial to get your news widely disseminated by an authoritative source to relevant media, influencers, websites and search engines in addition to the individual outreach to your personal contacts.  That’s where we come in.  Business Wire provides a multi-platform approach to news distribution that goes beyond simply emailing and posting news to your website.  While email is just one distribution tool used by communicators, it is limited in reach to contacts on a particular list … and its accuracy is dependent upon any last updates. The newswire, is designed to reach “desks” of reporters and editors, decision-makers at the federal and/or state level with direct feeds, and to give unparalleled online visibility with advanced SEO capabilities and full-text posting to thousands of news and information web sites and systems.  Plus, Business Wire content is a trusted, authoritative news source by Google and other search engines, as well as major news organizations.

Proper use of keywords in a well-written, engaging press release, issued via Business Wire’s Public Policy Wire is among the most effective ways to reach directly key audiences, while engaging the public in your conversation.


PRSA 2010: What To Do Around Town

October 12, 2010

by Danny Selnick, Vice President, Public Policy Services

Attending the PRSA 2010 International Conference? If you’re not from “inside the Beltway” you’ll surely find Washington, DC a fun-place for this year’s annual convention.

Sure, we’re all here to learn, but try to find some time to experience Washington after hours by taking a self-guided tour at night of the national monuments that line the National Mall and environs.  Beyond the Lincoln Memorial, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Washington Monument and The White House, check out some of the newer and equally interesting moments including The WWII Memorial, The FDR Memorial, and the Korean War Memorial.

Not far from the Washington Hilton Hotel is the Adams Morgan neighborhood, which hosts some interesting ethnic and standard-fare restaurants in an area that’s so “un-Washington”  — from Ethiopian to Mexican and more.  You can also visit Ben’s Chili Bowl (a favorite of President Obama) that’s open into the wee hours.

South of the hotel is the Dupont Circle neighborhood, home to lots of interesting architecture, shops and several foreign embassies and missions housed in historic buildings.

Getting around in DC is easy: The Dupont Circle Metro Stop is just a few blocks from the hotel, where the Red Line can take you to Metro Center for a quick walk to the National Mall, or to catch trains to other parts of the city.

At the conference, our own Laura Sturaitis will be presenting a panel on Tuesday morning, along with Greg Jarboe, president and co-founder of SEO-PR. The session, titled “What’s the ROMI of Social Media, Online Video and Press Releases?” will take a look at which of the new PR tools delivers the highest return on marketing investment, and how to get the most from all of them.

Don’t forget to stop by and see Business Wire at Booth 201 in the Exhibitors Hall where we’ll be happy to talk to you about the latest in news distribution services and technologies, including Public Policy Services, NewsHQ (our state-of-the-art online newsroom service) and more.  While you’re there, drop your card in our fishbowl to register to win a free netbook. And we’ll even be doing some magic to entertain!


Media Relations in the Digital Age Event Recap

July 15, 2010

by Cecile Oreste, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire DC

Members of the Business Wire/DC team were in attendance at Media Relations in the Digital Age held at the US Navy Memorial & Heritage Center on Wednesday, July 14th.  The event, which was organized by the Professional Development Committee of the PRSA – National Capital Chapter, welcomed four journalists – Ceci Connolly, Nancy Marshall-Genzer, Greg Ip and Jordan Rau – to discuss “how to fearlessly pitch big-league media and get big-time results.”

Ceci Connolly

Ceci Connolly

Ceci Connolly is the national health policy correspondent for the Washington Post.  She has been a staff writer at the Post for over a decade and has covered politics, health care and several major disasters.  Prior to joining the newspaper in 1997, she covered politics for Congressional Quarterly and worked at the Washington bureau of the St. Petersburg Times.

According to Ceci, public relations practitioners need to think strategically about which news organizations they are targeting.  “The more you can be targeted, the more you can be effective,” she said.  Assist reporters by providing factual information with credible sources, understanding deadlines and knowing what beats they cover.

Nancy Marshall-Genzer is a senior reporter for the Washington bureau of Marketplace.  Previously, she worked as a newscaster for NPR and WAMC in Albany, New York, as well as an anchor at Oregon Public Broadcasting.

Nancy reminded the audience that “the early bird gets the worm.”  Send pitches with plenty of lead time and plan events around days when journalists may not be as busy.  Mondays, Fridays and holidays work best.  Marketplace will generally be seeking out stories during these times.

Greg Ip

Greg Ip

Greg Ip is U.S. Economics Editor for The Economist and also contributes to The Economist’s blog Free Exchange.  Before joining The Economist in 2008, he served as chief economics correspondent of the Wall Street Journal and created the paper’s online blog Real Time Economics.

According to Greg, reporters at The Economist are generally looking for experts with deep knowledge about the subjects they are covering.  He suggests inserting your organization into the context of a story.  “Describe why something affects you in a positive or negative way.  Examples are very valuable,” he said.

Jordan Rau

Jordan Rau

Jordan Rau is a reporter for Kaiser Health News.  His KHN stories have been featured in publications such as the Philadelphia Inquirer, as well as news sites including NPR.org and MSNBC.com.  Prior to joining Kaiser Health News, he covered government and health care politics for the Los Angeles Times, Newsday and the Concord Monitor.

When it comes to public relations, Jordan recommends focusing on “people, data and dish.”  Find people who are affected by the issue your organization is concerned about and truly illustrate the story.  Provide quantifiable data which can easily be used in a story.  Finally, don’t be afraid to dish out information about your competitors.  “Some of the most successful people in public relations are the experts in opposition research,” he said.  Pitches that suggest conflict with competitors often get more attention than stories that highlight your organization’s own products, services or success.


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