How PR Pros Reach the White House and Other Political Groups

November 24, 2014

This year’s PRSA Annual conference included an excellent discussion on the various tools organizations use to engage with The Hill.  In this piece, Danny Selnick, SVP of Public Policy and LatinoWire, outlines that discussion as well as the latest research on the communication habits of congressional offices and their staffers.  Click here to learn more about how these target audiences get news, who they rely on, the role of social media, and how Business Wire’s Public Policy circuits reach and impact this group every day.

 


Understanding the Role of Latinos in the U.S. Economy

November 14, 2014

As Hispanic Heritage Month comes to a close, we wanted to share this piece written by Pilar Portela, Business Wire’s media relations expert.  In this article, Pilar looks at the dynamics within the Latino culture that drive the U.S. economy.  With $1.2 trillion annual buying power, many companies are expanding their PR and marketing programs to include Hispanic audiences.  Are you?  If you are looking to launch a PR program for this key demographic, let us know. We have a wide range of resources and information that may be useful to you.

In the meantime, we highly recommend you read this piece to see exactly how powerful this demographic is and what steps organizations are taking to reach them.


Case Study: Utilizing Press Releases to Reach Canadian Media and Consumers

October 14, 2014

Earlier this month, Business Wire spoke with HOOPP, Healthcare of Ontario Pension Plan about their use of press releases.  In this CommPro podcast, Martin Biefer, the Director of Public Affairs at HOOPP to discuss HOOPP’s press release success story and his opinions on how to rise above the news clutter.

In just 8 minutes, learn how a single press release caught the attention of an entire country.  Click here to read the article http://www.commpro.biz/public-relations/media-relations/wire/ or watch the video below.


LatinoWire Webinar News Conference: US Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis on “The State of the Latino Worker in the US”

August 30, 2012

Today, as part of LatinoWire’s Expert Webinar Series, US Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis spoke about The State of the Latino Worker in the US.  Her presentation addressed a variety of topics, including the role of Latino workers in the ongoing economic recovery, the administration’s investments in job training and labor law enforcement, and projections on the future contributions of Latinos to the American workforce.

Sec. of Labor Hilda Solis

US Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis
(click for a downloadable, high-resolution version of this photo)

If you missed this event, you can view the entire recorded webinar here, or view the Secretary’s presentation and download her prepared remarks below:

Additional links:


Free Webinar with US Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis on the State of Latino Workers

August 22, 2012
U.S. Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis

U.S. Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis

On Thursday, Aug. 30, in advance of Labor Day, Business Wire will host a free webinar with US Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis, the first Latina to head a major federal agency in a president’s cabinet, to discuss the state of the Latino worker in the United States.

Secretary Solis will discuss the gains that Latinos have made during the economic recovery; specific sectors of growth and opportunities; challenges and prospects for women, veterans and youth; vulnerable workers; and department efforts in worker training and education for the Latino community.

This event is FREE for all attendees. The webinar will be moderated by Danny Selnick, Vice President, LatinoWire & Public Policy Services, Business Wire/DC; and Pilar Portela, Media Relations Supervisor, Business Wire/Miami.

To register, please visit: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/559226112

NOTE: Q&A session open to to the public, but questions are limited to working journalists.  Reporters must identify themselves and their news organizations when submitting written questions during the webinar. Questions may be submitted ahead of time to danny.selnick@businesswire.com


Covering Your Bases on The Big Issues This Election Season

May 25, 2012

by Danny Selnick, VP, Public Policy Services

by Danny Selnick, Vice President of Public Policy Services, Business Wire DC

The upcoming presidential election and national political conventions are looking to be a contentious time.  No doubt this will be an interesting election cycle where also the entire House of Representatives is up for grabs, as is nearly one-third the Senate.

So will the president (incumbent or newly elected) have a Congressional majority that can push along and support legislation that’s near and dear to him? Or will the country have a divided Congress that will keep it in political gridlock? The stakes are huge with political and economic and even global ramifications. Not even the pundits can agree. But one thing’s for sure, professional communicators with some interest in the outcomes will need to get the word out. The question is, with what strategy?

No longer can public affairs communicators rely solely on getting their message out to traditional media. They must also reach out to grass-roots supporters, influentials and voters by using social media — and use it effectively in creating powerful networks and communities. Additionally, communicators must use powerful search engine optimization tools to make sure their news is seen.

Let’s not also forget that the United States Supreme Court will be handing down its decision on the constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Should the Court let the Act remain as is, not much will change and the law that was enacted two years ago will continue to be implemented. There will be those organizations and state governments that will remain opposed, but they’ll have to abide by the ruling. However, should the Court rule against the Act, no one really knows what will happen. Dismantling what has already been in effect will not be easy, and the Republican Leadership (including Mr. Romney, as well as those even at the state level) will have to come through on their promise of a better plan.

In sum, public affairs/corporate communicators and government relations professionals should be working on their messaging and thinking about the tactics to reaching all their key audiences. One more very important point to mention is that the American public (and voters) is not homogeneous. Far from it. Communicators need to remember to include messaging to the Hispanic community (that has been growing in numbers, power and importance) as well as to African-American, Asian-American and other groups.

Selnick is Business Wire’s Vice President for Public Policy and LatinoWire Services and developed specialty targeted services that are designed to reach any organization’s key audiences — from the media to decision-makers … to getting your message in front of the public that goes online looking for news.  The Public Policy Wire also includes Issues-Focused Lists that reach beat reporters by personalized email — including Health Care and Presidential Campaign.


Tweeting the Campaign: Three Ways Social Media is Changing the Way Reporters Cover the Election

March 5, 2012
by Shawnee Cohn, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/New York
MRT

Shawnee Cohn

Twitter CEO Dick Costolo recently proposed that 2012 is going to be the year of the “Twitter Election,” referring to the power that the social network offers presidential candidates to engage with voters.

Not only are candidates contributing to the Twitter conversation, but the media is also breaking important campaign news in 140 characters or less. Here at Business Wire, we offer all of our Public Policy and Election news at the Twitter handle @BW_PublicPolicy.

In response to this trend in news distribution, Twitter recently created an official account, @TwitterForNews, which offers tips for journalists on how to cover the 2012 election most effectively.

As part of Social Media Week, The New York Times hosted a panel discussion which delved deeper into the topic of how social media impacts political coverage. The panel featured:

The panelists offered compelling evidence for the argument that social media is critical when sending out your election-related news. Here are some highlights of how journalists utilize Twitter and other social networks:

To monitor breaking news: Stevenson stated that “every political reporter uses Twitter as a news feed all day long.” Smith agreed, admitting that he now heavily relies on Twitter traffic, in addition to some RSS news feeds, to get the day’s headlines. Instead of tuning in to watch the debates on television, one could simply scan all of the highlights by solely reading relevant tweets, noted Hamby. However, both Hamby and Stevenson advised that it is important to occasionally detach yourself from Twitter. Taking a step outside the Twitter realm helps journalists to avoid snap judgments and observe the opinions of those who are not as involved with the social network. Being that reporters rely on various mediums to get their news, it is important to send out your message on multiple platforms, such as a news wire, Twitter, mobile alerts, etc.

To accurately relay readers’ real concerns: Michel discussed how social media offers journalists the capacity to “systematically engage people” and therefore “find stories that you wouldn’t otherwise.” Smith also uses Twitter as a “place to find questions” from the public, rather than answers. Social networks allow the media to get a feel for what people are wondering about, and to consequently be more responsible to their audience, said Stevenson. For example, in the recent cases of the Komen/Planned Parenthood decision and the SOPA bill, journalists monitored the negative reactions to the policy choices on social networks and chose to report on the backlash in depth. The Washington Post places importance on reflecting “what’s happening socially,” and incorporating the “conversation around things” into their reports, says Zamora.

To interact with other political reporters:  Stevenson explained there is a “clubhouse effect” when it comes to political reporters; they tend to engage in discussion with one another and this can sometimes lead to a closed feedback loop. This creates a sort of “virtual spin room” that plays out in real-time. You can watch and learn from this ongoing conversation by following multiple political journalists (you must follow both users on Twitter to be able to see @ messages). It is also critical to establish yourself as a credible source if you are trying to gain the attention of any number of these reporters. CNN and other major media will not report anything on Twitter that they would not report on any other platform – a valid source is always essential.

For more information on Social Media Week, visit socialmediaweek.org.You can find the latest election/campaign news by registering at www.businesswire.com, or by following @BWPolitics and @BW_PublicPolicy.


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