Agence France-Presse Shares: How to Work with Global Newswires

November 19, 2015

Legendary news agency, AFP, opens up to discuss their organizational structure, Agence_France-Presse_Logo.svgcoverage criteria, and practical tips on how  to build a relationship and work more effectively with their journalists. This is a must-listen-to webinar and can fundamentally transform the impact of your global communications.

To listen to the full webinar click here  

Agence France-Presse [AFP] is one of the world’s largest and most prestigious news agencies, with a network of 200 bureaus generating some 5,000 stories per day. Despite its prestige and influence, many communications professionals, particularly in North America, are largely unfamiliar with the scope of AFP’s geographic footprint, and its role in shaping the global news agenda.

Speakers included:

Moderator:  Raschanda Hall, Global Media Relations Manager, Business Wire

Learn the Newswire’s Role in Making Your News with this Visual Journey

November 4, 2015

What role exactly does a newswire play in the journey of your news? An announcement makes an expedition before going public and influencing potential clients and consumers. That expedition involves many pit stops, including the addition of multimedia and determining the proper circuits to best reach interested parties.

Business Wire created a video to demonstrate the exact journey your news takes before becoming news.

You can view that video here and learn about each step in detail by reading Serena Ehrlich’s breakdown of How a News Release Becomes a News Story.

Serena Ehrlich is the Director of Social and Evolving Media at Business Wire and was one of the authors of Let’s Get Visual: Multimedia and the News Release, a free white paper identifying the science and trends behind multimedia’s impact on the success of news releases. Download this paper now: Let’s Get Visual!

A Behind the Scenes Look at How Newswires Distribute News Releases

October 26, 2015

Sometimes the best way to learn how something works is by watching it in action. Business Wire wants people to know exactly how news is made and have captured the process in an exciting new video.

What starts off as an announcement goes through a process of editing and enhancement before entering a hub. Think of it as a digital metro station that leads to stops around the world where your information travels to journalists, bloggers, reporters, and other media professionals and publications.

Key takeaways from the video about the news making process:

  • A news release should go through several drafts to ensure maximum readability and accuracy
  • Know (and write for) your target audience
  • Include multimedia such as photographs, graphics, and if possible, videos to increase release views
  • Measure the results to gauge impact of your news

In order to make the news it’s important to know how news is made. Learn the exact steps and make sure to maximize the impact of your next announcement.

Business Wire’s 2015 Media Survey Reveals Best Practices in Media Relations

October 20, 2015

By Serena Ehrlich, Director of Social & Evolving Media, Business Wire
Earlier this year, Business Wire asked reporters worldwide their preference for being pitched – from the type of news they prefer, to best practices for continuing relationships after coverage was secured.

The results of the Business Wire 2015 North American Media Survey provide a strong road map for communicators to follow when looking to increase the visibility of their organization via news coverage.

Click here to download the full survey results now:

Media_Relations_Info_FINALStep 1:  Write an interesting release
This may sound easy enough, but in order to catch a reporter’s attention, your news release needs to contain the information they want to cover.

When you craft your next news release, focus on the breaking news and interesting story angles as well as quotes to increase the likelihood of pick up.

Step 2:  Multimedia is no longer optional
As more and more reporters are providing news content for online sources, there is a growing need for multimedia.  What kind of multimedia? The element most preferred is a photographic with graphics, videos, infographics, logos and audio files rounding out the list.

Why is multimedia so important? As we discuss in Let’s Get Visual, multimedia elements allow readers to engage and absorb information in new ways, building deeper emotional connections between the reader and the news story.  And reporters are not just relying on you to provide them with supporting multimedia – more than 64% of reporters are creating their own to supplement content.

In short, if you want to tell your story in your voice, supply reporters with multimedia to ensure the highest possible adoption of your news.

Step 3:  Your News Release Distribution Service Matters
News distribution services such as Business Wire play an important role in the news ecosystem. 63% of media respondents noted that their jobs would be harder without newswires to vet and deliver news releases.  Commercial newswires provide media outlets with an ongoing stream of trusted, breaking news in a variety of formats, allowing reporters to access and produce news coverage throughout the day.  And what newswire do media outlets trust the most?  At 67%, Business Wire continues to be the top newswire of choice for today’s media.

Step 4:  Social Pitching is Not Advised
Despite the use of social media for research purposes or for identifying hot news trends, 75% of reporters said they do not want to receive pitches via social media

Rather than pitch reporters via social channels, use the channels to identify who is writing about your industry and to gain a better understanding to the types of news your top reporters are interested in writing and sharing with their readers.

Step 5:  The Role of Your Online Newsroom
Where do reporters turn to research your pitch? Your online newsroom!

When breaking news hits the reporter’s desk, the next step is for the reporter to research the news, the company and the impact your news has on their readers. 77% of reporters turn to company online newsrooms to find the information they need to turn your news release into a headline.  Frequently updated newsrooms provide reporters, and other interested parties, on-demand access to the news releases, multimedia and other branded content – perfect for reporters responsible for writing news stories in a 24/7 world.

Bonus tip? Share your coverage!
The top metric for judging the success of a news story continues to be inbound traffic to that piece. Help reporters meet this metric by creating a strong coverage sharing program to not only increase views, but awareness of your news.

Securing coverage in a selfie world is not easy, but by following the steps provided in the 2015 Business Wire Media Survey you can build stronger relationships with your key media targets and increase the chance to receive more media coverage.

Click here to share these survey results on Twitter:

Download the complete 2015 Business Wire Media Survey now:

How to Write an Earnings Release For All Audiences

October 7, 2015

By Natasha Artavia, Business Wire

With another earnings season to soon commence, there’s no better time to review a few editorial practices that will provide your investors, the media, and your company with a successful, interactive earnings release.

Let’s start with the basics. Your headline is an essential element of your earnings release, as on databases, RSS feeds and social channels it’s often the first, or only content visible to analysts and investors. Keep your headline short and to the point. Journalists and the investor community will be actively searching for your announcement, and a succinct, search-optimized headline is crucial to their locating your release.

Revolution Lighting Technologies Earnings subhead


Your sub-headlines should emphasize your company’s most important financial figures and business position from the previous quarter or fiscal year. These could include: dividend announcements, sales growth, share increases, financial results from a major product launch, YOY and/or quarterly growth. Using bullet points to format your sub-headlines can make your layout more visually appealing, but don’t go overboard. Treat your sub-headlines as premium real estate that provides your audience with the important highlights of the quarter. Compelling sub-headlines will encourage your audience to continue reading below the fold.

While there is a plethora of financial information that must be disclosed to your investors and the media, this data shouldn’t overwhelm the reader with blocks of text. Here are a few ways you can provide your audiences with a more reader-friendly earnings announcement.

  • Use bullet points to break up the numbers

The use of bullet points in a financial news release will draw the readers’ attention to the significant facts and figures. Plus, bullet points provide clean divisions between separate sections within your text, while also doubling as quick “numbers at a glance” references for the media.

  • Tables can help illustrate your news by providing readers with a visual breakdown of the information you have included in the release

Just because you have provided full financial tables in your earnings announcement, this doesn’t mean you can’t insert imagery within the body of your news release. These tables should be smaller and can provide comparisons to prior years or quarters, or highlight certain aspects of financial growth. Think of these tables as additional resources the media can use to develop their story.

  • Earnings InfographicIncrease message adoption with multimedia

Providing a visual element with your earnings release will not only increase media pickup, but will augment a predominantly text announcement. Consider adding an infographic that shows readers the growth your company experienced this past quarter or fiscal year.

  • Don’t forget your hyperlinks

It’s extremely important to add hyperlinks or URLs for the media and investor community. If you are directing your audience to the Investor Relations section of your website or the earnings webcast, don’t tell them where to go…show them. Provide them with the registration link that will take them directly to the event. If you have a report or are providing your company’s earnings as a download, include the URL that forwards readers to these resources. Hyperlinks are an excellent tool to increase engagement with your audience. Links add additional texture and depth to your release, giving the reader a better experience.

Best_Practices_for_Enhancing_Earnings_Release_WP_1However you decide to format your earnings release, we hope you find these suggestions to be useful. You can also download Business Wire’s Best Practices for Enhancing Earnings Releases whitepaper here.

And remember, at Business Wire, our editors, client services representatives and account executives understand how stressful the earnings period can be. From submitting your order to confirming distribution timing and formatting, we’re here to help make this process as smooth and efficient as possible. Feel free to reach out to your local newsroom before submitting your next earnings release. We can work with you on the best way to submit your release and the best time to disseminate the announcement.

Click here to share these tips on Twitter:

Taking Stock of the World Media – A Recap of the Global Media Forum

August 27, 2015


By Kai Prager, Senior Media Relations Specialist – Frankfurt

In crisis situations around the world, the media has an undeniable impact on perception of events. It also shapes public opinion and can even manage to influence political decision makers. With the help of the internet, media access has multiplied and more and more platforms now vie for our attention. It made sense, then, that the topic of this year’s Global Media Forum, hosted by Deutsche Welle, was “Media and Foreign Policy in the Digital Age.” About 2,000 journalists and media workers came from more than 100 countries to take part in the discussions and workshops in Germany’s former capital Bonn.

Participant looking at the Plenary Chamber - Photo by Kai Prager

Participant looking at the Plenary Chamber – Photo by Kai Prager

Many presentations noted that the internet, with its vast platforms of social media, blogs, news sites, etc., has radically changed the media landscape by enabling anyone to participate and creating a demand for speed of information. But the demand for speed also puts pressure on traditional media. This was not lost on Andreas Zumach, a journalist with German paper Die Tageszeitung.

“We have a rat race to see who is first with the most spectacular news,” Zumach said. “That makes it difficult for journalists who cover the efforts to de-escalate or even solve the conflict at a diplomatic level to get coverage.”

Asiem El Difraoui, a researcher for the Institut d’Études Politiques de Paris, stated, “We run after the news … we don’t do permanent coverage of places which are still potentially dangerous and might explode from one minute to the next.” El Difraoui also lamented that a lot of media reduce its foreign coverage and are later surprised by the consequences. “People are much more interested in what is happening in foreign countries than what we give them credit for.”

Dana Asaad and Asiem El Difraoui - Photo by Kai Prager

Dana Asaad and Asiem El Difraoui – Photo by Kai Prager

At this international forum, the situation of foreign countries was discussed on many levels. It was mentioned that, often, media of countries in transition are not as advanced as media in more developed countries, and this often causes problems. The main problems that were visited and revisited were the lack of quality journalism due to poor training and funding; no freedom of the press; usage of media for propaganda and misinformation; and no access to information.

An example for this problem was shared by Dana Asaad, Editor-in-Chief of, who said that a lack of well-trained journalists contributes to the continued conflict in Iraq.

“It’s obvious that covering a post-conflict [Iraq] … we need to have qualified people,” Assad said. “Before 2003, we had few media outlets – you could count them on your hand – and it was the media of the Baathist regime. One color, one opinion, one ideology.  After 2003, suddenly, hundreds of media outlets came out. Every single political party and every single official had its own media. … but we didn’t have journalists.” Asaad continued, “Journalism became the job for jobless people. You fill all those media outlets with people who have no journalism background and they know nothing about the ethics of journalism and those people started to cover the post-conflict time.”

There was also a discussion about propaganda in political reporting within the Russia-Ukraine conflict. Ukrainian journalist Yevhen Fedchenko explained that propaganda tools to promote the government’s message are mainly implemented by Russia to change, omit or manipulate facts. In contrast, the Ukrainian government doesn’t have the same means to promote its propaganda though the media. Instead, news outlets started to target different groups and usually don’t keep up journalistic standards.

Many speakers mentioned problems with authoritarian governments that try to stop unwanted reporting. Saudi blogger Raif Badawi was honored with the Freedom of Speech award at the annual prize competition The Bobs (Best of Online Activism).  In his ceremonial speech, Editor-in-Chief of, Jochen Wegner, said the ceremony was “among the most bitter, for Raif Badawi cannot be with us today.” Badawi is currently serving a 10-year prison sentence in Saudi Arabia for criticizing senior religious figures online.

Jochen Wegner holds his ceremonial speech - Photo by Kai Prager

Jochen Wegner holds his ceremonial speech – Photo by Kai Prager

After three days of discussions and workshops, it became clear that media professionals need to band together and work together on a worldwide basis. The Global Media Forum served as a jumping off point for this type of comradery and coordination, and hopes to continue foster international journalistic cooperation into the future.

Journalism Technology and the Canadian Media – A Game of Give and Take

August 12, 2015

Jean-Adrien (2)

By Jean-Adrien Delicano, Media Relations Specialist – Canada

In June, I attended the Canadian Association of Journalists (CAJ) annual conference in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The CAJ conference is generally considered the largest gathering of Canadian journalists during the year and offers journalists a place to exchange ideas, tools and a few laughs.



The conference covered a lot of subjects regarding the state of journalism. Speakers held panels about ethics, investigative journalism, different types of reporting and tips on how to succeed as a journalist today.

One particular subject that dominated the conference was the role of technology in journalism. These days, technology goes hand-in-hand with just about everything in our lives, be that organizing our days, facilitating tasks or providing entertainment. Technological advancements have also played a big role in improving news gathering, production and consumption. These new tools for journalists range from drones with cameras designed to capture images from different vantage points, to web programs that intend to protect the identity of sources.

Trevor Adams, editor of the local city and lifestyle publication Halifax Magazine, agrees with the notion that technology improves journalism. That said, there can be pitfalls that may come as a result of technological advancements.

“Many of the technologies referred to are becoming essential tools for journalists and it was good to learn more about them,” Adams says. “However, as other sessions discussed, these technologies also have the potential for great intrusion on personal privacy. I was pleased the conference covered both sides of the issue.”

Nick Taylor-Vaisey, current president of the CAJ and moderator at the conference this year, agrees that new technology has benefited modern newsrooms. But he also says there is risk involved when trying out the latest and greatest gadgets and apps.

Nick Taylor-Vaisey

Nick Taylor-Vaisey

“Many of journalism’s technologically driven projects are experiments. That’s important, because it demonstrates that newsrooms can innovate and try things out with no guarantee of success,” Taylor-Vaisey says. “Of course, that latter bit is also important to note: Not every experiment works as intended or delivers what was expected.

“One of the enduring themes of CAJ 2015 was that we brought together innovators who know what works and who could pass on some of that knowledge to their peers,” he continued. “Those delegates all return to newsrooms that are stronger for that learning.”

Topics regarding technology in journalism covered at the conference included:

Using drones for news gathering: Drones can be used to capture captivating footage for news stories from a perspective that has not always been available to everyday people until recently. Drone journalism is an emerging field in the industry, and soon it will be a useful tool for journalists. While drone journalism has been prominent in other countries around the world, the issue of safety and ethics has affected the use of drones for news reporting in Canada.

Data journalism: Math and numbers may scare off some journalists, but they can also help them find stories buried in the data. Spreadsheets and analytics can be used to discover trends, predict possible future results or further verify facts. Recently, Canadian journalism schools have begun to offer more data journalism classes, as young journalists are seeing the value in stories underneath the statistics.

Covering your online tracks: In this age of digital surveillance, the safety of your sources, and perhaps even yourself, can depend on an ability to cover your tracks online. With threats posed by hackers and the NSA, your privacy may be compromised during the chase for a great story. A CAJ panel brought up some tools and tips that can help journalists protect their sources and secure their own safety.

Photo and video journalism right in the palm of your hand: Journalists once had to rely on heavy, expensive and intrusive technology in order to capture photos and videos for their stories. Today, journalists can use their handheld, pocketable smartphones to capture photos and videos in ways not possible as recent as a decade ago, improving the speed and accuracy of modern news reporting. The CAJ Conference featured panels that discussed how to take advantage of mobile technology when it comes to photo journalism, and how to verify that what we see is true in the age of speedy and citizen journalism.


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