Business Wire Gets Socially Analytic with NUVI

February 13, 2013
by Sandy Malloy, Senior Information Specialist, Business Wire/SF
Sandy Malloy, Senior Information Specialist

Sandy Malloy, Senior Information Specialist

I do love information.  My Business Wire Twitter handle is @BWInfoDiva and in my profile I even describe myself as a “baseball stat geek.” But I am the kind of stat geek who appreciates statistics only for what they mean, and I like to be able to use them to some end.  I didn’t enjoy Moneyball because I think that OBP is so cool (that’s “on base percentage” for you non-baseball-stat-geek types);  I enjoyed it because of the way it illustrated using statistics to place a value on previously undervalued assets and then turning that information into action; in this case, to maximize an organization’s budget.

Many of Business Wire’s clients face the “How do I make sense of this data and what action should I take?” dilemma when it comes to analyzing social media.   There are many excellent social media monitoring and analysis products in the marketplace.  I should know, as I’ve seen more than my share of demos.  But until I saw a demo of new Business Wire partner NUVI I couldn’t tell many of those products apart.  They all had sentiment metrics; they all showed the number of posts, and followers;  they all targeted “influencers”; and they all presented charts and graphs.  In my opinion, there were too MANY charts and graphs and after a while they start to run together in my mind.

What’s different about NUVI is that the underlying information might be similar to data that other social media monitoring and analysis companies are gathering, but the presentation is more accessible and far more useful.  NUVI is built on a visual platform that allows customers to actually see the key metrics in real time as a bubble stream.  Or, they can simply focus on an easy to understand overview that provides sentiment, influencers, popularity, and trend information at a glance.

NUVI bubble stream

NUVI Bubble Stream (click for full-size)

NUVI overview

NUVI Overview (click for full-size)

It’s difficult to describe data visualization in words, but here’s an analogy:  Imagine that someone tells you there’s a fire in the neighborhood.  Then imagine you are looking at a graphic of some type showing you where a fire might have been detected 15 minutes ago.  Now imagine looking out your window and seeing flames and smoke.  Which scenario would be most likely to get you to evacuate immediately?  Data visualization makes it easier to turn information into action.

Speaking of action, NUVI provides tools that make the sentiment, popularity and influence of posts immediately apparent.  So, much of the guesswork is removed from  the decision to engage with a member of your social media audience, or not.   Clients can click on a large bubble, indicating a high degree of influence and/or popularity, and contact that person directly.  This interactivity is built into other parts of the platform as well.  And since the product is truly “real time”, even volatile situations can be monitored as they unfold.

Business Wire and NUVI have partnered to bring our clients this powerful social media monitoring/analytics platform. To learn more, please visit our NUVI information page on BusinessWire.com.


Pinning Your Press Releases on Pinterest

December 5, 2012
by Sandy Malloy, Senior Information Specialist, Business Wire

Sandy Malloy, Senior Information Specialist

We already know that having a photo accompany a press release will result in more views of that release.  Back in April, I approached this same topic from a different angle and mentioned that Pinterest had become the third most popular social site on the Web.  But did you know that a press release can easily be pinned right from the Business Wire site?

We have made the Pin It button available on the top of every release, as well as beneath each multimedia asset.  While we have found that people do share both text releases and photos from Business Wire on Pinterest,  people are most likely to share visuals.

Pinterest "Pin It" button beneath a Smart News Release graphic on BusinessWire.com

Pinterest “Pin It” button beneath a Smart News Release graphic on BusinessWire.com

What this means in the context of the modern, super-charged press release is that on top of all the benefits that accrue to multimedia releases – more clicks, more sharing in general, content that can outlast the release itself – Business Wire clients now know that the images they use to tell a compelling story can broadcast that story more readily than ever before.

Who uses Pinterest?  This infographic (appropriately enough) breaks down the demographics along with the most popular interests.  But just because crafts, hobbies and design are among the leading topics doesn’t mean that boards are limited to these rather obvious areas of interest.  As we’ve seen on the Business Wire-sourced page, anything can be pinned.   So, balsamic vinegar ketchup bottles share the page with the world’s smallest 4K USB 3.0 camera and a Charmin wedding dress.  (Make that an award-winning Charmin wedding dress.)

If you are distributing a press release on Business Wire, why wait until a viewer decides to pin?  You can pin it yourself, just as you probably already tweet, or post to your Facebook page, or otherwise share the content you have created on social media.  However, it’s best to remember that even while trying to promote your company or client, it’s best to think in terms of “how can I help someone?” rather than “how can I sell something?”  Your board can be amusing or useful, practical or frivolous, but it has to give people a good reason to stop by and check it out.


Does Including a Photo Get You More Views? Rutgers CMD Wins SNCR Award for Finding Out

November 13, 2012
by Phil Dennison, Senior Marketing Specialist/Business Wire – Cleveland

As we’ve stressed again and again, multimedia drives press release views online — our own measurement data shows it, and so does pretty much everyone else’s. This past Friday, though, the Rutgers University Center for Management Development (CMD) won an award from the Society for New Communications Research (SNCR) for looking into it in an unconventional way: What happens when you distribute the same release twice, once with a photo and once without?

The photo distributed by Rutgers CMD with their second of two identical press releases one week apart.

With the help of SEO-PR, Rutgers CMD wrote and optimized a press release concerning an upcoming promotion, then distributed it via Business Wire at identical times one week apart, first without a photo, then with one. Everything else – headline, content, formatting, and so forth — was identical. The photo was the only difference.

The result? Despite the fact that Google News didn’t index the second release, it got 20% more views and 63% more clicks in 14 days than the first press release got in 21 days. Taking into account search engine penalties for duplicate content, that’s a pretty impressive result.

Even better, according to Eric Greenberg, Managing Director of Executive Education, Rutgers CMD, “This campaign has already generated seven registrations worth $31,500 in incremental revenue for Rutgers CMD, which is 8.75 times more than the $3,600 spent on writing, optimizing and distributing the press releases over Business Wire with and without a photo. So, conducting the study has paid off financially as well as academically.”

To further bring home the importance of press release optimization, after issuing the press release announcing this award, Rutgers CMD got some very impressive search results:

This is not the first such research that Rutgers CMD and SEO-PR have conducted into press release ROI. Greg Jarboe of SEO-PR recently authored a white paper for Business Wire, Linking Press Release Output to Outcomes, that details three separate sets of research on when best to send a press release and whether an active press release campaign has measurable revenue effects. Download it today to find out more.

Congratulations to Rutgers CMD and SEO-PR on their prestigious award, and we hope to bring you more research from them in the future.


13 Tips To Sharpen Your Communication Skills in 2013

October 18, 2012

Raschanda Hall, Global Media Relations Manager, Business Wire/Chicago

By Raschanda Hall, Global Media Relations Manager, Business Wire/Chicago

There is a distinct buzz in the air during the final quarter of the year.  In the PR community, this growing sound is our nagging reminder to sit down and think about new business, budgets, cuts and strategies for 2013.

We’re no different, so our team looked at our own best practices to empower you with 13 tips to make you a better communicator in 2013.

13. Commit to commenting. Stop being a social media voyeur.  Be active by liking and commenting on posts you read.  The comments can be as interesting as the posts; many people read them and they’re a good way to make connections.

12.  Give before you ask. No matter what service you provide, even the well-intentioned invitation can be seen as a demand for time, effort, and attention. Take this tip from Chris Sacca, advisor to some of the top social media companies, “If you’re insightful and helpful, people will want to be around you.”

11.  Refine your elevator pitch. How? Practice, edit, repeat. If you pitch TV stations you know assignment editors are willing to listen, but you’d better be able to get your point across fast! Call five assignment desks, and chances are, you’ll hone your pitch quickly.

10.  Subscribe to industry newsletters and READ THEM. PR/communications newsletters such as CommPRO.Biz, MediaBistro,  Smart Brief on Social Media and Ragan’s PR Daily offer helpful suggestions for improving your written and verbal communication skills and keep you up on industry trends. You might recognize a misstep you consistently make, such as avoiding an overused word.

9.  Get involved with an industry organization.  Don’t just attend events — join a committee, serve on the board, or simply volunteer your time as you can. Be sure not to limit yourself to PR/IR groups.

8.  Learn more about the offerings of your service providers. OK, this one may be a bit self-serving, but don’t shoot the messenger.  Many PR-related service providers are constantly advancing their catalog of offerings, providing free reporting, or creating complementary products to go along with the services they’re most known for.  Take the meeting and find out what else they offer for you to maximize your relationship.

7.  Have an SEO discussion with your web team, your wire vendors and your content creators. If one conversation isn’t enough, have however many it takes for you to understand search engine optimization (SEO) basics and start using these strategies to improve the visibility of content you produce for the web.

 6.  Take a class or seminar.   Many schools and professional societies offer continuing education classes at a low cost, and some even offer free sessions. Consider classes in photography, advanced web technology or web design.  You can even brush up with a business writing or grammar class.

5.  Attend a journalism conference. The price tag of some PR conferences can be off-putting.  Directly across the aisle our industry peers are putting together great and pertinent programming at a fraction of the cost.  Check out conferences organized by the Online News Association, Society of Professional Journalists or one of the journalists-of-color member organizations like NABJ, the National Association of Black Journalists.  You’ll learn a lot and make some new contacts while you are at it.

4.  Share your experiences. If you have no time to sit on a board or a committee, offer to speak at one of their programs on a  topic you know matches the interests of their members.  In PR groups, speakers on the topics of social media, measurement, crisis communications, media relations and brand strategy are highly sought after!

 3.  Invite a blogger out for coffee. If you don’t work with bloggers, meet up with an editor, producer or member of the Twitteratti who you value having a relationship with.  Even if they can’t meet face to face, the check-in email is a nice gesture and way to keep a relationship top of mind even if you’ve moved on to cover new areas.

2.  Be an active listener.  Multi-tasking, while great in so many ways, contributes immensely to our eclipsed attention spans. Make an effort to listen more closely.  Practice by playing a prerecorded webinar and not clicking away; or watching or listening to an on-air personality you don’t agree with and resisting the urge to turn away or blurt out.  Just listen.  If you improve your listening skills you might pick up the other half of what most people don’t hear when someone is speaking.

1. Immerse yourself in mobile.  Mobile marketing is the future, but the future is today.  To leverage this market for you and your clients you need to use it. Download news apps and visit the mobile rendered pages of your favorite brands. Then make sure your own messaging is mobile friendly.


Why You Should be Alerting Investors via Mobile

October 3, 2012

News audiences, all of them, are on the go these days: More than half of all US adults own a smartphone or tablet, and more than 60 percent of those read news on their devices at least once a week. As mobile starts to complement – and in some cases, supplant – desktop usage, it’s important to make sure that you’re reaching audiences where they are. And that’s more true when it comes to market-moving news targeted at investors and analysts.

Nigel Malkin, president of Brand2hand Media, recently led a webinar for Business Wire called “Mobile Alerts for Investor Relations.” In this webinar, Nigel discussed the whys and wherefores of reaching investors by mobile. A few highlights from that event:

  • SMS open rates are more than 90% on average, compared to 22% for email
  • Mobile users generally open SMS messages within 4 minutes, compared to 6 hours for email
  • Different markets have different text character limits, and messages must be designed accordingly
  • There’s a definite way to structure your mobile alert messages for top effectiveness

You can listen to the archived webinar here, or view the accompanying slide presentation below.

Afterwards, learn more about how we can help you add mobile alerts to your own investor relations program.


Is Apple’s iOS 6 Update Affecting Your Search Traffic?

October 2, 2012

Last month, just prior to releasing the new iPhone, Apple released iOS 6, the latest version of its operating system for mobile devices – iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. And as SearchEngineLand details, that update may be affecting what you’re seeing in your traffic data.

Safari is Apple’s own web browser, and it’s used by nearly 87% of iOS device users. So if someone is browsing the web on an iPad or iPhone (which 64% of mobile users are) it’s likely they’re using Safari.

The important change here, which SearchEngineLand explains in great detail, is that someone coming to your site via a search using Safari’s built-in Google search box no longer shows up in your traffic logs as search or referral traffic.  They show up as direct traffic, no different from if they had simply typed in your URL.

This appears to be an unanticipated result for everyone involved, and may result in Google making some changes to how searches via mobile are forwarded to the destination site. In the meantime, though, be aware that searches showing up in your NewsTrak Reports and other analytics as “direct traffic” may in fact be searches from iPad and iPhone users.

Combined with last year’s changes that no longer pass search terms through from logged-in Google users, this adds another complication for marketers and PR people trying to maintain an SEO/SEM strategy. It’s a quickly shifting landscape, so make sure you’re aware of all the trends and changes before making adjustments to your own strategy.

 


New Study Reveals Trends in Mobile News Consumption

October 1, 2012
by Phil Dennison, Senior Marketing Specialist, Business Wire

A joint study by The Economist Group and the Pew Research Center for Excellence in Journalism, released today, explains how tablet and smartphone ownership is changing how people read news. The study, called “The Future of Mobile News: The Explosion in Mobile Audience and a Close Look at What It Means for News,” is rich in detail on topic after topic, including ownership trends, paywall effectiveness, mobile ad effectiveness, article depth, and more.

One table reveals what times tablet users tend to view news during the day, depending on whether they check news once or multiple times. The implication for corporate communicators: Make sure you’re releasing your news at the right time for your target media to see it, act on it and plug it into their own news hole.

Elsewhere, the study outlines the differences in news consumption among tablet user who use mostly apps, mostly their browsers, or a combination of the two:

Again, based on this information, communicators can decide whether it’s in their interest to target web-based online publications, to ensure that their news shows up in mobile news apps, or even whether they should be developing their own apps.

The complete study is full of data and information that will help your company develop its communications, public relations, marketing and mobile strategies. It’s worth a read by all professional communicators, journalists, and anyone connected to the news business.


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