Global Relations Has Changed – The Shift from Information to Participation

September 22, 2014

This year’s Global Media Forum held in Bonn, Germany launched a new shift in thinking for today’s media outlets.

Historically, relationships between media and companies have been about information sharing.  Companies write press releases, media outlets write coverage based on that information.  But this has changed.  In 2014, news sharing is shifting from learning by reading, to learning via participation.

Read this piece by Business Wire Germany’s Senior International Media Relations Specialist Kai Prager to learn more about this shift, and what changed the way Europeans think about media, news and news sharing in 2014.

http://www.commpro.biz/public-relations/media-relations/global-media-trends-shifting-information-participation/


Business Wire Spotlight: Meet Canada’s Emily Khazak

April 4, 2014
Welcome to Business Wire’s latest series, a behind the scenes introduction to our offices, and our staff from around the world.   Meet Emily Khazak, Business Wire Canada
Emily's-Photo-lo-res

Toronto Customer Service Representative Emily Khazak

 

Where are you from?
Toronto

When did you start working for Business Wire?
August 2011

So what do you do for Business Wire? Please sum up your role and responsibilities at Business Wire.
I am the Client Services Representative for both the Toronto and Calgary offices. I assist existing and prospective clients with inquiries and registrations. I am also a direct assist to the Account Executive team, helping with new business development.

What do you enjoy about your job?
I enjoy getting to interact with clients on a daily bases, making sure their registrations and release disseminations run as smoothly as possible.

What do you like about Business Wire?
The best part about working at Business Wire is the people! I love coming in to work each day knowing I’m part of an expert team, who are all passionate about what they do. I also love working for a company that excels in the newswire industry! The products and services we offer, as well as the attention given to each client, make me proud to be part of the Business Wire team.

Please give a brief summary of what you hope to accomplish for your department and Business Wire.
By assisting the Sales teams in both the Toronto and Calgary offices, I contribute to new business development and client retention. I hope to contribute to the growing offices by making sure all clients are well taken care of.

Tell us about yourself. (Your background, education, interests, hobbies, music, books, pets, family, etc)
I’ve always had an interest in media. I started writing at a young age and was sure I wanted to do something in the communications field, which lead me to a post secondary education in Journalism. I love reading and will always be found with a book, magazine, article – anything written!

What drives you to do what you do every day at Business Wire?
The best motivator is knowing that I’m part of a team that’s passionate about what they do and work hard to make sure every client that calls in gets the best service possible!

What is your favorite thing about living in Canada?
The weather!

Please give us some comments about the Canadian market and what Business Wire does that makes us a great fit in that market.
Business Wire has an exclusive partnership with the Postmedia Network and excellent Canada-wide distribution options. Our Canadian disclosure capabilities and specified circuits, including SEDAR filings, make us ideal for public companies. With offices in both Western and Eastern Canada, we have an expert team on hand no matter what part of the country a company is located.

What are some top reasons why you would recommend Business Wire to Canadian companies?
Business Wire’s Canada-wide and bilingual distribution options, including numerous trade publications, are ideal for getting any company’s news to the right outlets. With Business Wire’s NX technology and multimedia capabilities, turn around time for releases will be fast, accurate and visually appealing.


Tips for Getting Your News Noticed in Singapore

January 21, 2014

By Ai Arakawa, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/Tokyo

Ai Arakawa

I recently had the opportunity to take a business trip to Singapore. In the course of my meetings, I was able to speak with some very influential members of the Singapore media. What I took away was a new knowledge of the country’s media and some tips for those sending them news.

The Business Times
Since 1976, The Business Times is Singapore’s only financial daily covering local, regional and international business news. The publisher, Singapore Press Holdings (SPH), is one of the most influential publishers owning more than 100 media outlets in Asia. The editorial team at Business Times focuses on grasping the latest economic trends in Singapore as well as around the globe and analyzes this information with deep and original insight. Here are some tips that The Business Times shared during my visit:

  • They are not really a “big fan” of receiving a product news release from each company by email.
  • However, they enjoy checking AP, Bloomberg and other major information providers for global economy information and also check the releases provided by Business Wire.
SPH News Center

SPH News Center

Berita Harian & Berita Minggu
SPH publishes the daily newspaper in Malay language, Berita Harian, launched in 1957 and now boasts a circulation of 59,300. Its Sunday version, Berita Minggu, claims 57,800 copies as circulation. BH, says:

  • Despite the language in the newspaper, most of the releases they receive every day are in English and this doesn’t bother the editorial team.
  • 75% of the paper covers Malay community related topics, so if the releases are related to Malay community, there might be more opportunities to get the coverage. However, they do cover international news as well and he’s personally interested in politics, travels and trends.
  • They enjoy and use social media as well. In addition to Facebook and Twitter, they also use Instagram for topical research.

I found it very interesting to see their use of Instagram, because CNET recently published an article mentioning that Instagram now has a bigger average monthly smartphone audience compared to Twitter based on the data recently disclosed by Nielsen.

The New Paper
Also published by SPH, this is the daily tabloid newspaper in English founded in 1988 with a circulation of 90,800. The paper’s motto is “People”. Link your pitch and tips towards people if you expect the coverage in this paper. They enjoy social media such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn as other Singapore journalists do.

Today

“TODAY lady” at MRT station

“TODAY lady” at MRT station

This is the English daily newspaper from Monday to Saturday published by another leading publisher in Singapore, Media Corp Press. The subscription is free of charge and we can get the paper from the ladies in “TODAY” jackets who hand out the papers in the major MRT (railway system) stations. According to Richard Valladares and Rosalind Png, Assistant Vice Presidents, there are many original articles thanks to their correspondents from around the world. This global content allows them to sell their news in other countries and helps supplement their ad revenue stream.

Like many media outlets around the world, Singapore journalists look for news of interest to their readers, by subject or geography and utilize social channels to round out their articles.  To increase media coverage by these reporters, we recommend a compelling relevant headline, interesting multimedia and including links to social channel content useful to the story.

Liked this article? Let us know!  Business Wire is a global newswire service with offices across the globe.  What other regional media relations tips are you interested in learning about?


Tips for Your Business Meeting with a Japanese Company

December 16, 2011
by Ai Arakawa, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/Tokyo
Ai Arakawa, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/Tokyo

Ai Arakawa

Different people have different customs, and you might think that the uniqueness of Japanese customs is outstanding or exotic.

Robin Pharo, who, after working for a Tokyo IT department, penned an article in JAPAN TODAY about the Japanese and their “entirely different” meeting style compared to their American counterparts, is awed by the seriousness and formal structure of meeting in Japan.  And it’s true – the Japanese could make the business meeting formal in a harmonious and respectful mood.  

I’d like to introduce some tips that might help you at your visits with Japanese companies on your business trips.

Meeting time

It’s important to arrive on time, or five minutes earlier than the meeting’s start time, as Japanese value punctuality. If you arrive late, call your contact person as soon as possible and announce your estimated arrival time. However, it’s another story for the meeting’s closing time. Meetings in Japan often exceed the allotted time, expanding on various topics including non-business related talks, so it’s best practice not to schedule back-to-back meetings.

Appropriate attire for business meetings

Even though this certainly depends on with whom you are meeting (CEO or ordinary employee), it’s safest to wear a suit (with tie for men). But in recent years, thanks to the government’s energy saving campaign “Cool Biz” for summer and “Warm Biz” for winter, the dress code at the business meeting has become more relaxed. This is particularly the case this year as many companies try to save electricity to avoid the power shortages that could have been caused by the great earthquake and tsunami in Tohoku region earlier this year.

Bowing and the seat you take in the meeting room

When you visit and meet your client, your contact person may bow instead of shaking hands, as Japanese people frequently bow when meeting others or thanking or apologizing to someone.

Also, your client may pay attention to where you sit down. The seat furthest away from the entrance is called “kamiza” and it is reserved for the most important person in the room. As the guest, you may be taken to this “kamiza” seat with respect. It is expected that you take the seat if it is offered to you.

Exchanging Business cards

Exchanging business cards

Japanese values the meishi (business card) exchange as the time of formal self-introduction. The person with higher title exchanges the card with the more senior person of the other company first. Then the persons with lesser titles will exchange cards. Introducing your company name and your own name with a bow, hand your card out and receive the other one with both of your hands.

Do not put the given card away in your card case or in the pocket of your jacket, keep it out on the table during the meeting. Writing something on the given card is not recommended — take good care of the card with respect as if it was an extension of him/her.

Any gifts to bring?

Offering a gift is not a strict tradition as is often thought. It would be nice timing to bring a gift if your visit occurs during either of the two gift giving seasons: One is “ochugen,” the season from the beginning to the middle of July; and another is “oseibo,” which is the season from the beginning to 25th of December. People and companies exchange gifts during these periods to express continuing gratitude.

If the meeting person doesn’t unpack your gift, don’t think he/she doesn’t like it, as there is a code of conduct and it’s rude to check what it is in front of the client.

These are just a part of Japanese business manners. Your client should understand that they are meeting with non-Japanese visitors, so do stress over following these guidelines precisely, but just enjoy the communication with your client. That’s what matters most.


Don’t Let Your Press Releases Get Lost Without Translations

April 14, 2011
by Daniel Blue, Senior Editor, International Desk

Daniel Blue, Senior Editor, International Desk

Daniel Blue, Senior Editor, International Desk

Businesses who want to rush their international releases sometimes ask us to skip translations. Translations take time, and if  English is indeed “the universal language of business,” why not leave out that middle step?

When clients ask this of the International Desk, we suggest they consider the following:

  • Partners in China, Japan, France, Russia, Latin America and Eastern Europe (among others) don’t accept English-only copy at all. In other words, English-only releases won’t be received by several of the largest markets in the world.
  • Agence France-Presse, the French version of the Associated Press, will not send in English to certain areas of the world. AFP is one of the world’s three largest news agencies, and when it doesn’t distribute your news, the lost exposure is significant.
  • If a release isn’t translated, it won’t show up in that language on the Business Wire website. Nor will it be aggregated into newsfeeds by the Chinese, Japanese and other non-English services that scrape our news pages. That’s another huge missed opportunity.

So who does receive releases sent only in English?

A few large markets will accept these, notably, Germany, the Netherlands, Korea, India, Spain, Italy, and Scandinavia.   Also, certain international journalists that have specifically asked for English copy will receive the feed from from Business Wire though our Press Pass program.

But how many people in those countries will actually read the release?

While some viewers will be fluent in English, many will not, and pick-up is bound to be limited by not having the release in the native tongue.

Bottom line: use translations. They’re part of the price, and if you want to look them over beforehand, we’re glad to oblige.  But don’t hobble your coverage by refusing to use them at all.


Talking Turkey and International Media Relations: Pitching Turkish Media

February 14, 2011
by Kai Prager, Media Relations Representative, Business Wire/Frankfurt

Turkey is a country that has seen increasing interest in recent months and we’ve experienced more queries recently on how to pitch Turkish media. Perhaps a more stable government and the “stellar growth” of the Turkish economy accounts for this interest.

The Turkish press is rich and diverse, with about 40 national newspapers selling 4.5 – 5 million copies per day. The most popular include Zaman, Posta, Hürriyet, Sabah, Milliyet, Türkiye, Cumhuriyet and Vatan, and represent the scope of Turkish society from traditional and conservative to liberal and socialist.

About 900 local and weekly papers flourish throughout Turkey, in Kurdish languages, Greek, Armenian, Arab and Hebrew. The big national papers such as Zaman are printed in Turkish but also produce English versions, Daily News and Today’s Zaman.

As the official language, Turkish is the language of choice when pitching local media. We find that most publishing houses employ journalists who speak English, or even German, but releases delivered in the native languages will get more attention. If you don’t send your story in Turkish, make sure you send it to writers that speak your language.

Most newspaper web sites list the staff writers, the articles they’ve written, and ways to contact them. Don’t forget to do your homework and peruse the clips before contacting journalists.  As elsewhere in the world, Turkish media appreciate your familiarity with their work and dislike irrelevant pitches.

We advise a follow-up phone call to make sure a story gets noticed after sending. And, as always, having a relationship with the reporter helps.  Visuals can give you an advantage in capturing attention as well — photos, graphics, logos, anything that makes it easier for time-strapped reporters to assemble a story.  Just like reporters around the world, members of the Turkish media appreciate the entire story package, not just the text.

It’s worth noting that just as in the United States, press freedom is part of the constitution, even though Turkish law allows for some restrictions.   Article 301 of the penal code makes it a punishable offense to “insult Turkishness.”

When the writer and Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk was prosecuted under that Article for a speech given during an awards ceremony in which  he criticized the government, it became an international incident.  Be advised also that insulting the founder of modern Turkey, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, is punishable by law and has lead to the blocking of some websites like YouTube.

PR professionals can effectively target Turkish media by familiarizing themselves with journalist preferences, crafting a newsworthy release, including multimedia and following up.  By doing so, your press release is likely to get the attention it deserves.


Shrinking International News Output of UK Papers Creates Opportunity for PR Pros

February 7, 2011
by Michel Rubini, European Media Relations Team

A recent report titled “Shrinking World” published by the Media Standards Trust suggests that the loss of international news coverage by UK newspapers is a gain for public relations pros.

The report, written by Martin Moore and published in November 2010, details how international reporting in UK newspapers has decreased in the last 30 years by nearly 40%. The report compared international reporting output for one week in 1979 with 2009 from four national papers, The Guardian, the Daily Telegraph, the Daily Mail, and the Daily Mirror. The conclusion: international news coverage has diminished dramatically.

Counting all the foreign news stories in the four newspapers in the same week over a period of 30 years, the total number decreased from 502 in 1979 to 308 in 2009 (see graph below).

The reasons for the decrease are multiple. Original foreign reporting is expensive. A foreign bureau costs $200-300,000 a year, based on a 2007 analysis by Jill Carroll for the Harvard Shorenstein Center.  As a result, UK newspapers have reduced the number of journalists based abroad, replacing them with freelancers.

The end of the Cold War in 1989 factors into the decrease in foreign reporting as well. The Cold War provided a clear framework and rationale for covering international affairs which a domestic audience relied upon.  Also contributing to the decline is the rise of more specialised media, such as locally based satellite TV, or online local editions of foreign newspapers, and even social media outlets like Twitter and Facebook.

In such a setting, it’s no surprise that UK-based correspondents rely on news sources from the country of origin as well as newswire content like that provided by Business Wire to fill in the gaps, turning the loss of foreign correspondents in UK newspapers into a gain for PR professionals and their clients.


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