Think Globally and Act Locally with Business Wire’s New Multilingual Twitter Feeds

July 1, 2015

By Serena Ehrlich, Director of Social + Evolving Media

Business Wire today increased the visibility of its global news content with the launch of 19 new language-based Twitter feeds. This initiative is a continuation of Business Wire’s thinking globally, acting locally efforts aimed at ensuring our client’s news reaches local audiences around the world.

wire pic2

Business Wire’s new language-based Twitter feeds will enhance its already strong social media presence, bringing its Twitter news feed presence to a total of 84 accounts.  The new Twitter handles feature tweets based on news releases distributed in the following languages: Chinese (CN), Chinese (HK), Czech, Danish, Dutch, Estonian, Finnish, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, Latvian, Lithuanian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Spanish, and Swedish.

Business Wire’s new language specific feeds can be found at the following URLs:

Have questions about our new multilingual Twitter feeds, or want to learn more about Business Wire?  Let us know.

Click here to share this information out on Twitter: http://ctt.ec/01pck

Stay up to date with the latest news and trends impacting today’s communications programming. Join our mailing list today!


Snacking On News … Will It Fill Your Brain?

June 23, 2015

Simona Bio

By Simona Colletta, International Media Relations Specialist – Paris

The internet helps people understand new things like the best way to clean a bicycle chain, proper snooker techniques, and how to change a car’s head lamp. But, according to a recent Pew Research Center study, the internet is not helping people comprehend the news. The study found that only 42 percent of people were able to answer basic questions about the news.

How could this be? Why are people so uninformed about the news when they have so many options to get the news? Maybe it’s precisely because they have all of those options. People are no longer digging into news stories and completely digesting them; instead, they are merely snacking on the news. According to the study, 59 percent of the time people do not read past the headlines on internet stories. The snacking is light, it seems.

eating_paper

While the Pew Research Center Study doesn’t identify study participants by geographic location, I live in France and was recently alerted to an Odoxa survey done for Trooclick, a French start-up company that developed an opinion-driven search engine which uses a natural language processing technology to gather news and opinions online. The survey reveals some interesting data on how the French view today’s news landscape.

85 percent of French people believe that they have more information available

Between ongoing chains of information, online news sites, search engines, and social networks, the French feel more informed than they did ten years ago. A whopping 85 percent of them believe they have more information on the news. This finding is shared widely across the population, regardless of age, social class, or income level.

Graph 1

The French do not feel more informed

If the French have won in terms of quantity of information available to them on the internet, they certainly don’t feel they have won in terms of quality. Although 77 percent consider the available information on current events is becoming more varied, only a minority believes that information is becoming more useful.

It must be noted that the internet offers so much in terms of information, but that information is often scattered, poorly organized and frequently redundant. The result? Of every 10 articles read, less than half are read in full (4.5 exactly). A tiny minority of French (8 percent) read every article in full.

Graph 2

Nearly 7 out of 10 French are interested in a free online service that would deliver them a summary of every point of view on a news event

The logical conclusion to the results of the survey (and encouraging for Business Wire and Trooclick) is that 66 percent of French people would be interested in a free online service that would deliver to them a summary of all current events. The youngest were the most interested: 8 out of 10 would be keen on this kind of online service.

Snacking on the news is not bad in and of itself, but we should be attentive, as we are in our kitchen, to the quality and reliability of what we snack upon. In this massive jungle of media and information, a reader can now count on interactive tools that help him/her to select the best “product” and follow his/her fields of interest.

Have a bite!

Try Business Wire’s Press Pass or click here to visit trooclick.com

Click here to share this story on Twitter.

Stay up to date with the latest news and trends impacting today’s communications programming. Join our mailing list today!


Don’t Eclipse Your News During the Lunar New Year – Why Sending News to China During the Spring Festival is a Bad Idea

February 18, 2015

Bio Pic 2

By Matt Allinson, Media Relations Manager – International Markets

China’s Lunar New Year is nigh (February 19), but the travel frenzy known as Chunyun (a 40-day period surrounding the Spring Festival) is well underway. It is a migration unlike any other, with an estimated 2.8 billion passenger trips undertaken between February 4 and March 15. Millions upon millions of people will be hurrying home to reunite with family and enjoy the holiday. It is said to be the largest annual migration in the world.

China

Chunyun travel in progress

With so many people concentrating on getting from one place to another, it stands to reason that not a lot of business gets done in the People’s Republic of China during this time of celebration. It also stands to reason that sending out a news release around the holiday is not a wise move – unless, of course, you’d rather people not see your news.

Shaun Bowers Interfax ChinaI had the opportunity to speak more about this with Shaun Bowers (pictured left), the Managing Director of Interfax News Services in China. He was kind enough to answer some questions I had, as well as some questions that are often put to me.

Q: Can you describe the impact Spring Festival travel has on not only the news distribution business, but all business in China?

A: It (business) almost stops. Family is at the very center of Chinese culture and this is the time of the year that workers all across China return to their home province to visit family. Often, it is the only time they will see their family during the entire year.

Starting in January, factories will stop taking orders because of the holiday and will be rushing to fill orders they have in hand. The distance workers have to travel means journeys can take days, so often workers will start traveling two weeks early … and it’s not uncommon for a factory to close for an entire month. So for most businesses, it is a quiet period … unless you are a food vendor near a train station or a retail clothing store (it is traditional to buy new clothes for the Spring Festival).

Q: A question I have received in the past is: Don’t the Chinese have the most cell phones (per capita) in the world? Wouldn’t they still be absorbing news on their devices during the holiday?

A: Perhaps you should ask them if they sit around the Thanksgiving dinner table and read the news. The Spring Festival is a time for celebration – the whole of China is on holiday and people are focused on fun and seeing old friends.

Q: To which western holiday would you compare the Lunar New Year? Or is there such a comparison?

A: It’s hard to compare … for Europe it would be Christmas, and for the U.S. I would say it’s like Thanksgiving … at Thanksgiving, people will do anything to get home. The U.S. has 330 million people and I’m sure readers can relate to what a nightmare travel can be during Thanksgiving. Now imagine adding another 900 million people, and you get a sense of what it’s like.

Q: What have been your personal observations and experiences with the Lunar New Year? Any crazy travel stories?

A: My wife’s family is from Hong Kong so we don’t have to travel, but it’s quite normal for us to sit down to dinner with 67 immediate family members … some of whom have traveled from all corners of the world. There is a saying in Hong Kong: “Don’t go on holiday as everyone you know will be on holiday, so stay in Hong Kong and enjoy the peace and quiet.”

yay-15943958-digital

According to Shaun, it’s not that people in China don’t read news during the holiday; it’s just not a top priority. Chinese New Year is the one time of year when all workers can return home and, in essence, MUST return home. It is important for them to do so and it is expected that they will return with gifts for the whole family. And in the end, what’s more important: being present with family or reading up on news about listed companies?

Shaun’s advice, and mine, is to hold off on sending any news to China between the 18th and 24th of February.

And I will take this opportunity to remind you that it’s a best practice to always make sure the country to which you’re trying to send news is not on a holiday.  A quick check of timeanddate.com, bankholidays.com, officeholidays.com, or any similar site can save you time, resources and headaches when sending news internationally.

Stay up to date with the latest news and trends impacting today’s communications programming.
 Join our mailing list today!

Global Relations Has Changed – The Shift from Information to Participation

September 22, 2014

This year’s Global Media Forum held in Bonn, Germany launched a new shift in thinking for today’s media outlets.

Historically, relationships between media and companies have been about information sharing.  Companies write press releases, media outlets write coverage based on that information.  But this has changed.  In 2014, news sharing is shifting from learning by reading, to learning via participation.

Read this piece by Business Wire Germany’s Senior International Media Relations Specialist Kai Prager to learn more about this shift, and what changed the way Europeans think about media, news and news sharing in 2014.

http://www.commpro.biz/public-relations/media-relations/global-media-trends-shifting-information-participation/


Business Wire Spotlight: Meet Canada’s Emily Khazak

April 4, 2014
Welcome to Business Wire’s latest series, a behind the scenes introduction to our offices, and our staff from around the world.   Meet Emily Khazak, Business Wire Canada
Emily's-Photo-lo-res

Toronto Customer Service Representative Emily Khazak

 

Where are you from?
Toronto

When did you start working for Business Wire?
August 2011

So what do you do for Business Wire? Please sum up your role and responsibilities at Business Wire.
I am the Client Services Representative for both the Toronto and Calgary offices. I assist existing and prospective clients with inquiries and registrations. I am also a direct assist to the Account Executive team, helping with new business development.

What do you enjoy about your job?
I enjoy getting to interact with clients on a daily bases, making sure their registrations and release disseminations run as smoothly as possible.

What do you like about Business Wire?
The best part about working at Business Wire is the people! I love coming in to work each day knowing I’m part of an expert team, who are all passionate about what they do. I also love working for a company that excels in the newswire industry! The products and services we offer, as well as the attention given to each client, make me proud to be part of the Business Wire team.

Please give a brief summary of what you hope to accomplish for your department and Business Wire.
By assisting the Sales teams in both the Toronto and Calgary offices, I contribute to new business development and client retention. I hope to contribute to the growing offices by making sure all clients are well taken care of.

Tell us about yourself. (Your background, education, interests, hobbies, music, books, pets, family, etc)
I’ve always had an interest in media. I started writing at a young age and was sure I wanted to do something in the communications field, which lead me to a post secondary education in Journalism. I love reading and will always be found with a book, magazine, article – anything written!

What drives you to do what you do every day at Business Wire?
The best motivator is knowing that I’m part of a team that’s passionate about what they do and work hard to make sure every client that calls in gets the best service possible!

What is your favorite thing about living in Canada?
The weather!

Please give us some comments about the Canadian market and what Business Wire does that makes us a great fit in that market.
Business Wire has an exclusive partnership with the Postmedia Network and excellent Canada-wide distribution options. Our Canadian disclosure capabilities and specified circuits, including SEDAR filings, make us ideal for public companies. With offices in both Western and Eastern Canada, we have an expert team on hand no matter what part of the country a company is located.

What are some top reasons why you would recommend Business Wire to Canadian companies?
Business Wire’s Canada-wide and bilingual distribution options, including numerous trade publications, are ideal for getting any company’s news to the right outlets. With Business Wire’s NX technology and multimedia capabilities, turn around time for releases will be fast, accurate and visually appealing.


Tips for Getting Your News Noticed in Singapore

January 21, 2014

By Ai Arakawa, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/Tokyo

Ai Arakawa

I recently had the opportunity to take a business trip to Singapore. In the course of my meetings, I was able to speak with some very influential members of the Singapore media. What I took away was a new knowledge of the country’s media and some tips for those sending them news.

The Business Times
Since 1976, The Business Times is Singapore’s only financial daily covering local, regional and international business news. The publisher, Singapore Press Holdings (SPH), is one of the most influential publishers owning more than 100 media outlets in Asia. The editorial team at Business Times focuses on grasping the latest economic trends in Singapore as well as around the globe and analyzes this information with deep and original insight. Here are some tips that The Business Times shared during my visit:

  • They are not really a “big fan” of receiving a product news release from each company by email.
  • However, they enjoy checking AP, Bloomberg and other major information providers for global economy information and also check the releases provided by Business Wire.
SPH News Center

SPH News Center

Berita Harian & Berita Minggu
SPH publishes the daily newspaper in Malay language, Berita Harian, launched in 1957 and now boasts a circulation of 59,300. Its Sunday version, Berita Minggu, claims 57,800 copies as circulation. BH, says:

  • Despite the language in the newspaper, most of the releases they receive every day are in English and this doesn’t bother the editorial team.
  • 75% of the paper covers Malay community related topics, so if the releases are related to Malay community, there might be more opportunities to get the coverage. However, they do cover international news as well and he’s personally interested in politics, travels and trends.
  • They enjoy and use social media as well. In addition to Facebook and Twitter, they also use Instagram for topical research.

I found it very interesting to see their use of Instagram, because CNET recently published an article mentioning that Instagram now has a bigger average monthly smartphone audience compared to Twitter based on the data recently disclosed by Nielsen.

The New Paper
Also published by SPH, this is the daily tabloid newspaper in English founded in 1988 with a circulation of 90,800. The paper’s motto is “People”. Link your pitch and tips towards people if you expect the coverage in this paper. They enjoy social media such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn as other Singapore journalists do.

Today

“TODAY lady” at MRT station

“TODAY lady” at MRT station

This is the English daily newspaper from Monday to Saturday published by another leading publisher in Singapore, Media Corp Press. The subscription is free of charge and we can get the paper from the ladies in “TODAY” jackets who hand out the papers in the major MRT (railway system) stations. According to Richard Valladares and Rosalind Png, Assistant Vice Presidents, there are many original articles thanks to their correspondents from around the world. This global content allows them to sell their news in other countries and helps supplement their ad revenue stream.

Like many media outlets around the world, Singapore journalists look for news of interest to their readers, by subject or geography and utilize social channels to round out their articles.  To increase media coverage by these reporters, we recommend a compelling relevant headline, interesting multimedia and including links to social channel content useful to the story.

Liked this article? Let us know!  Business Wire is a global newswire service with offices across the globe.  What other regional media relations tips are you interested in learning about?


Tips for Your Business Meeting with a Japanese Company

December 16, 2011
by Ai Arakawa, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/Tokyo
Ai Arakawa, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/Tokyo

Ai Arakawa

Different people have different customs, and you might think that the uniqueness of Japanese customs is outstanding or exotic.

Robin Pharo, who, after working for a Tokyo IT department, penned an article in JAPAN TODAY about the Japanese and their “entirely different” meeting style compared to their American counterparts, is awed by the seriousness and formal structure of meeting in Japan.  And it’s true – the Japanese could make the business meeting formal in a harmonious and respectful mood.  

I’d like to introduce some tips that might help you at your visits with Japanese companies on your business trips.

Meeting time

It’s important to arrive on time, or five minutes earlier than the meeting’s start time, as Japanese value punctuality. If you arrive late, call your contact person as soon as possible and announce your estimated arrival time. However, it’s another story for the meeting’s closing time. Meetings in Japan often exceed the allotted time, expanding on various topics including non-business related talks, so it’s best practice not to schedule back-to-back meetings.

Appropriate attire for business meetings

Even though this certainly depends on with whom you are meeting (CEO or ordinary employee), it’s safest to wear a suit (with tie for men). But in recent years, thanks to the government’s energy saving campaign “Cool Biz” for summer and “Warm Biz” for winter, the dress code at the business meeting has become more relaxed. This is particularly the case this year as many companies try to save electricity to avoid the power shortages that could have been caused by the great earthquake and tsunami in Tohoku region earlier this year.

Bowing and the seat you take in the meeting room

When you visit and meet your client, your contact person may bow instead of shaking hands, as Japanese people frequently bow when meeting others or thanking or apologizing to someone.

Also, your client may pay attention to where you sit down. The seat furthest away from the entrance is called “kamiza” and it is reserved for the most important person in the room. As the guest, you may be taken to this “kamiza” seat with respect. It is expected that you take the seat if it is offered to you.

Exchanging Business cards

Exchanging business cards

Japanese values the meishi (business card) exchange as the time of formal self-introduction. The person with higher title exchanges the card with the more senior person of the other company first. Then the persons with lesser titles will exchange cards. Introducing your company name and your own name with a bow, hand your card out and receive the other one with both of your hands.

Do not put the given card away in your card case or in the pocket of your jacket, keep it out on the table during the meeting. Writing something on the given card is not recommended — take good care of the card with respect as if it was an extension of him/her.

Any gifts to bring?

Offering a gift is not a strict tradition as is often thought. It would be nice timing to bring a gift if your visit occurs during either of the two gift giving seasons: One is “ochugen,” the season from the beginning to the middle of July; and another is “oseibo,” which is the season from the beginning to 25th of December. People and companies exchange gifts during these periods to express continuing gratitude.

If the meeting person doesn’t unpack your gift, don’t think he/she doesn’t like it, as there is a code of conduct and it’s rude to check what it is in front of the client.

These are just a part of Japanese business manners. Your client should understand that they are meeting with non-Japanese visitors, so do stress over following these guidelines precisely, but just enjoy the communication with your client. That’s what matters most.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 42,868 other followers

%d bloggers like this: