The Sweet 16: Business Wire’s Most Read, Viewed and Shared Content of 2014

December 16, 2014

By Serena Ehrlich, Director of Social and Evolving Content

Are You Ready for PR in 2015?  

As 2014 winds down, we at Business Wire are taking one last look backwards.  After all, there were some huge changes in 2014 that disrupted the way news content was showcased, distributed and adopted.

As we look towards a PR-friendly new year, we wanted to share the articles, videos and blog posts that your communication colleagues turned to this year so we can help you launch successful communications program in 2015!

How to write a press release:

The real reasons why your press releases need to include images:

Understanding media relations:

The role of measurement in PR

How Business Wire generates success for large and small companies alike [CASE STUDIES]

What are we missing?  What tips or tools do you plan on implementing in 2015?  Let us know in the comment box below.


With press release editing, catch erors befor they hapen

December 1, 2014

By Luke O’Neill, Editor, Business Wire Boston

We’ve heard it many times here at Business Wire: We catch a typo in a press release, let the client know, then the voice on the other end of the phone stalls, then sighs, “You don’t know how many people have looked at this thing, and that wasn’t caught.”

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That exasperation can be and should be avoided – especially before the release hits the wire and Web. Mistakes, alas, are inevitable, but it’s important to guard against them before they happen. After sending out a press release, the focus should be on promoting your news, not fixing it.

The editing process of any document can be cluttered at times with too many cooks in the kitchen, too many rewrites, and tracked changes simply can be confounding. Plus, don’t edit just for the sake of editing. Sometimes the writer has it right.

At newspapers or websites, editors generally read stories three times and three different ways – have you tried these yet?

  1. Breeze through it initially to get a sense of the story – it’s helpful to literally sit on your hands during this process so you’re not tempted to edit.
  2. The heavy lifting: Rewrite, rework and restructure the story as necessary.
  3. Fine-tune: Polish the prose and clean up typos.

The step between 1 and 2 can be tricky – you need to know how the story needs to be reworked, but that usually comes with practice and experience. This blog, however, is more focused on step 3 – finding those minute mistakes before they become major mistakes.

Eradicating Errors

So how do you sidestep slip ups while editing press releases? Most editors anticipate problems before they occur, know where things could go wrong before they do, ask where things could go wrong and think of the consequences of their editing actions. Yet sometimes it just comes down to having an eagle eye.

yay-3433113-digitalAlso, be mindful that the absence of one lone letter or the transposition of a couple letters changes the meaning of a word, and spellcheck won’t necessarily pick it up.

For example, heath vs. health: A heath is one thing, and health is something different. United vs. untied – these two words clearly have very different meanings. Other common press release examples include: manager vs. manger, complimentary vs. complementary, premiere vs. premier, chief vs. chef and through vs. though.

And be sure to check your spellcheck carefully; don’t just breeze through it because the document may be teeming with tech or biotech words. Often, Spellcheck will flag a word it does not recognize, yet the word is spelled correctly. Then later in the document, Spellcheck will flag a similarly spelled word, but it’s off by one letter. If an editor is on Spellcheck “Ignore All” autopilot, then the misspelled word will fly under the radar.

These spelling discrepancies are especially problematic in business press releases with mismatching company and product names.

‘Confident paranoia’

Many press releases simply could use a healthy dose of preventative medicine – an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

yay-1578342-digitalIn my local newsroom, we track the time spent on each correction issued by our clients. In my office, we average about 12 client corrections a month. During high-volume times, that correction total can spike. The corrections can be costly to our clients and counterproductive for everyone.

Some press release corrections are more significant and easily avoidable than others. Some common culprits include: incorrect event dates in releases; incorrect media contact information, especially phone numbers; incorrect titles for people; incorrect press release submitted; and not getting the proper approvals from all the companies involved in the release. But perhaps the most frequent offender is a broken or incorrect embedded hyperlink.

At Business Wire Boston, we preach the idea of “confident paranoia.” Be confident in your editing abilities, but, like a good carpenter, measure twice and cut once.

Luke O’Neill, formerly a newspaper reporter and copy editor, is a senior editor at Business Wire Boston. He has nearly 15 years of communications experience and a master’s degree in journalism.


How to Craft an Editorial Calendar

November 20, 2014

Several times a year, Business Wire’s Serena Ehrlich presents at TechMUNCH, the nation’s leading food blogger conference, on the topic of how to craft a successful editorial calendar.  If you haven’t had a chance to read this piece, check it out here: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20140926200156-1308357-blogger-pr-tip-of-the-day-why-you-need-an-editorial-calendar

In this article, Serena outlines why you should create and use an editorial calendar, various elements that affect the calendar, and how you can use events such as movie premieres, elections, breaking news, and more, to deepen the affinity between your blog and your readers.


Case Study! Increase Sales by Using Press Release to Promote Branded Content

November 16, 2014

Many of our clients are using press releases to not only promote breaking company news, but also to promote breaking company content.  In this case study, we speak with Jerry Goldstein, VP of William Mills Agency, to discuss how they used one press release to promote a white paper with spectacular success.  Results include WSJ coverage, social sharing, inbound traffic, and downloads by the company’s top prospects.

Are you using press releases to promote your content?  If not, read this piece today.  It will change the way you think of content distribution.

http://www.prnewsonline.com/featured/2014/10/15/william-mills-agency-increases-awareness-and-b2b-sales-with-content-distribution/


PR Professionals Rejoice! Business Wire and ITDatabase Launch TechCalendar

November 12, 2014

Earlier today Business Wire and ITDatabase announced the launch of TechCalendar, the industry’s most comprehensive, searchable, directory of tech events, speaking opportunities and awards.

TechCalendar takes the tens of thousands of consumer and enterprise focused tech industry events, awards and speaking opportunities and places them into one easy to search database. This single database provides PR professionals the ability to easily search, find and act upon highly relevant promotional opportunities.

Updated continuously, TechCalendar features a number of options for tech companies to track events important to their brand including:
  • Easy event and award discovery by keyword, topic or organizer
  • One-click “following” of all relevant events and awards, as well as show organizers
  • Calendar creation and integration opportunities
  • A variety of sharing and exporting tools for easy data integration

Click here to sign up for your free trial today.

 


New FREE Service, Expert Latinos, Helps Connect Hispanic Reporters with Sources

September 23, 2014

In an age where Hispanic media outlets are understaffed and reporters are on tight deadlines—in comes a new free service called Expert Latinos. Expert Latinos was created to help Hispanic reporters find sources and experts for their stories, saving them time and energy.

The way it works is very simple. Basically the reporter fills out a quick form directly on the website (ExpertLatinos.com) detailing what they are looking for. The request is then sent via a daily email to the list of subscribers, which consists of experts, entrepreneurs, public relation professionals and much more.  As a subscriber, if you see a story in which you can contribute to, you then simply reply directly to the reporter via email.

ExpertLatinos

Launched in April 2014, Expert Latinos has quickly become the go-to-source for Hispanic media outlets looking to quickly identify experts and sources. Among the media outlets already using Expert Latinos includes reporters and writers for: Univision, Telemundo, La Opinion, EFE America, Yahoo! Mujer, Vista Magazine, El Diario/La Prensa…the list goes on and on.

Reporters are submitting queries for just about anything from “I’m working on a story on the future of Spanish in the U.S. and need an expert in linguistics” to “I’m currently working on an article and need to interview entrepreneurs to talk about the best tools to grow their business.” Best of all, it’s completely free for reporters and sources alike.

So if you’re a source or expert and are looking to promote your business and get free exposure you can sign up here. Stay on top of the daily email alerts because you never know when something might come up where you might be the perfect fit. Simply reply back to the reporter via the email they provided.

If you’re a journalist and are looking for an expert or source for an upcoming story you can start submitting your request here. Reporters can also chose to send their queries anonymously, in which case their outlet and email will not be disclosed.  Expert Latinos will then receive the responses and forward them to the reporter.

So what are you waiting for?  Sign up today!


How Reporters Use Social Media in 2014

September 19, 2014

In the piece, “The Role of Social Media in Today’s Newsroom” Business Wire senior editor Paul Bowman takes a closer look at how today’s reporters are utilizing social media in their day-to-day work. And the results are somewhat surprising.  While today’s reporters rely heavily on social media and company newsrooms for research and article promotion, they are not interested in receiving pitches on this channel.

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So how can you influence reporters across social channels, without directly pitching them?  Read on to find out:  http://www.commpro.biz/social-media/social-media-pr-social-media/role-social-media-todays-newsroom/


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