How to Pitch a Story: Think Like a News Director

by Joyce Thian, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/Canada
Joyce Thian

Joyce Thian

If you want to know as a PR pro exactly how to get your stories “on the air,” news directors should be your go-to people. But it’s not every day that you get to sit down and chat with a news director—they’re busy people, after all, running entire news rooms and news departments on a day-to-day basis.

Luckily, this year’s RTDNA national conference (June 13-15) featured a lineup of back-to-basics workshops, one of which was a stellar “Making the Pitch” session with Dave Trafford, news director at Global News Toronto.

Dave Trafford

Dave Trafford

Trafford, an award-winning journalist and bona fide news veteran, took the time to share his tips on story pitches with a roomful of PR pros, freelance journalists, reporters, and producers. His insights into what works and what doesn’t when it comes to pitching offered that rare glimpse into the mind of a news director:

  1. Your idea has to be better than mine. Get me interested because if I’m interested, an audience will be too.
  2. If you’re going to pitch anything, it has to be about me. A good pitch will be about the person you are pitching to, no matter who they are. Make them care and relate it to them personally.
  3. Some of the best pitches are the ones that have left me mad afterwards. If the pitch provokes a reaction, I might want to see that story.
  4. Don’t confuse an idea with a pitch and don’t pitch by asking questions or listing some qualities. The pitch is essentially the first part of telling a great story.
  5. Good pitches land in the strike zone. Make a narrow pitch—be specific and focused enough that you can pitch your story in as short a time as it will be on the air. (Interested in more baseball-inspired PR tips? Check out this blog post from our global media relations director, Raschanda Hall!)
  6. Don’t overlook the things you find obviously entertaining or interesting; great characters can make great pitches or stories.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 38,591 other followers

%d bloggers like this: