“Meet The Hispanic Media Features Panel” Webinar Recording Now Available

October 10, 2012

If you missed LatinoWire’s Expert webinar,“Meet The Hispanic Media Features Panel,” with reporters from Efe News Service, Fox News Latino, NBC Latino, and Vista News Magazine, fear not! A recording of the webinar is now available for your listening pleasure.

Speakers:

Moderators:

Despite the issues we had with the audio (and we apologize), it was probably one of the most well-attended LatinoWire Expert Series Webinars to date — with lots of good tips, take-aways and contact information.  Below you’ll find a summary of what was said by each of our speakers, and should you wish to listen again to the full Webinar, kindly click on this link.

Claudia Solis - Servicio Hispano at Efe News Services

csolis@efeamerica.com

  • Servicio Hispano is focused exclusively on US Latinos for the past 8 years and is the main news supplier of many Spanish media outlets in the US, such as Univision, impreMedia, MSN Latino, Yahoo!, CNN en Español, Fox Latino, and about 90 other clients.
  • Our network has 20 correspondents, who are distributed throughout the main Latino markets in the US in Miami, New York, Los Angeles and Washington, DC.
  • We cover the Hispanic community in the US from entertainment to immigration, including sports, features, education, politics, community, etc.
  • We are looking for new voices, emerging topics, and exploring angles in coordination with the photo and video departments.
  • For product/service type stories we prefer that they have a human angle to them. Find an angle that tells a story and that is about people.
  • We are a Spanish-language news agency and prefer to receive news stories in Spanish but can work with English-language stories too.
  • Prefer to be pitched via email.

Carolyn Salazar — Fox News Latino

Carolyn.Salazar@Foxnewslatino.com

  • Targets second and third generation Latinos.
  • It has hardhitting, in-depth, investigative and light story lines from around the country and Latin America.
  • Launched two years ago, the website puts face on Latino issues through profiles or niche stories.
  • FNL covers news, politics, lifestyle, entertainment and health stories.
  • Daily operation so always looking for stories and story ideas. We cover substantive social issues and lighter stories that a human dimension to important Latino issues.
  • Since we have a national reach, we prefer issue-type stories and trends, rather than local events and products.
  • We like pitches tied to big events or holidays.
  • Prefer pitches by email, do not like phone calls.  We do appreciate when pitches know and understand our audience — second/third generation Latinos who still care about their culture, but are more comfortable speaking and reading in English.
  • We do profile individuals and companies, but the person and company should either be well-known or be doing something no one else is doing and that few people know about.
  • I appreciate pitches that show some preliminary reporting suggesting what the theme or the angle of the piece might be.

Nina Terrero — NBC Latino
Nina.Terrero@nbcuni.com

  • NBC Latino is unique from other Latino audience outlets because every single subject area we cover (politics, news, lifestyle, entertainment, technology and more) is written from the perspective of moving it beyond the usual conversation towards something more inspired, empowered and energized.
  • We report beyond the expected headlines and try to reflect our audience; where they come from and where they are headed. We know our audience is smart and accomplished, and we know they aspire for even more.
  • As someone who produces lifestyle content, I appreciate working with publicists who can write an articulate, compelling pitch (whether it’s a product launch, news-you-can-use, industry developments, etc.) accompanied with (when applicable) pictures, video and access to expert sources.
  • Email works best, but a follow-up call is often appreciated and I am accessible via Twitter as well at @thenininsky.
  • My stories appear throughout NBC Latino on various verticals and have run on NBC Universal outlets like the Today Show, Nightly News with Brian Williams, Education Nation and MSNBC.
  • Towards that end, I appreciate working with someone who can look beyond the expected to create a story that’s compelling and reflective of a dynamic population here in the United States.

Marissa Rodriguez — Vista Magazine

marissa.rodriguez@vistamagazine.com

  • Vista is a 27-year-old magazine that caters to Latinas, helping them “live the good life made simple.” We are a resource guide for living an organized, streamlined and fulfilled life.
  • In both print and on our website www.VistaMagazine.com, we focus on simple solutions for everyday challenges in the areas most important to our reader’s lives.
  • In print we publish six themed issues per year: Health (January/February), Work & Life (March/April), Parenting (May/June), Back to School & Style (July/August), Education & Hispanic Heritage (September/October) and Holiday (November/December). However, each issue offers an array of content across the spectrum of topics we cover. Our tone is inspirational and aspirational, but always accessible.
  • The best pitches for us are those about people or things that can show us how to make our lives easier. Ideally, they should also be very in-culture, featuring Hispanic spokespeople or sources, showing how they relate to Latinos, or be otherwise very relevant to our audience.
  • We are a dual-language magazine and website, so pitches in both languages are accepted.
  • Pitches with images are preferred.
  • For print, our ideal time frame is 60 days prior to circulation. Pitches for web can be accepted with a much shorter lead-time. E-mail pitches are preferred.

Getting Your Pitch Camera-Ready: Tips for PR Pros from National Broadcast Media

October 9, 2012
- by Shawnee Cohn, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/New York
MRT

Shawnee Cohn

In the public relations field, there’s no placement like a national broadcast TV placement. Getting your client on a top television program offers invaluable publicity. However, with this much sought-after media coverage comes much stiffer competition to get your pitch noticed by reporters and producers.

Recently the New York chapter of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) held a media panel of experts from top, national broadcast television programs.

Moderated by Suzanne Lyons of Ketchum Public Relations, the panel included:

Following are some highlights that the experts offered for communications professionals:

Build a relationship: While some reporters and producers strictly prefer e-mail communication, others might be willing to meet with you at their office or to grab a coffee. Face-to-face time can go a long way in terms of building a rapport with the media, said Raff. At the Rachael Ray Show, most of the talent bookings originate from PR pros that Crudup has known for over 10 years.  Weber agreed, noting that she prefers to only speak over the phone with publicists who she has an established connection with. If you do not already have a standing relationship with a certain member of the media, the best way to begin developing one is by offering quality pitches.

Lend a helping hand: Reporters and producers know best when it comes to what their viewers want. With that said, giving them a “head start” when it comes to a storyline is always appreciated, noted Raff. If your pitch is in some way helping her do her job better and faster, Weber will be more likely to give it more than a passing glance. All of the panelists were in agreement that video and images are essential to give your pitch a leg up. In the world of TV, offering a visual element to your story cannot be overlooked. A useful tactic is to think of who/what you would like to see on TV prior to sending your pitch, according to Weber. If you do not find your own pitch interesting, than the media probably will not, either.  Jarvis suggests finding some element of “tension” to your story, by discussing the “players and competitors” or other intriguing aspects. Keep in mind that for human interest stories, the individual at the center must be able to speak about their experiences live and in an articulate, compelling way.

Be upfront: If your client is a paid spokesperson or is scheduled to appear on several other television programs, honesty is the best policy. “Communication is key,” according to Raff. Producers might be flexible and even let your paid spokesperson mention their product several times, as long you are open about their intentions right off the bat. Television shows always want an exclusive and prefer to know ahead of time if they would be following a competitor by covering your story. “Withholding information is not good and puts your reputation at risk,” warned Weber. If a client appears on a program and only gives manufactured answers seemingly crafted by a PR person, the relationship between the publicist and that particular show could be permanently damaged, noted Jarvis.

For more information on the PRSA New York Chapter , visit www.prsany.org. You can also get the latest entertainment news by registering at www.businesswire.com


Business Wire Holds Media Roundtable in Portland, Oregon

October 5, 2012
by Lauren Linscheid, Senior Client Services Representative
Business Wire/Seattle

Lauren Linscheid

Journalists, public relations professionals and communicators turned up for Business Wire’s media roundtable discussion in Portland, OR last month. Each attendee was able to spend 15-minute sessions with four out of the seven media representatives in attendance; many joked it was like speed dating with reporters. Participants were able to ask questions directly to journalists, and journalists gave insight into how their days are planned and unfold.

The media representatives included (pictured L-R below):

Media:  

Michelle Brence, Investigative/Enterprise Editor, The Oregonian
Nick Bradshaw, Assignment Manager, KATU News
Rick Turoczy, Editor, Silicon Florist
Eve Epstein, Managing Editor, OPB News
Matt Kish, Reporter,  Portland Business Journal
Tamara Hellman, Assignment Editor, KOIN Local 6 News
R. Bruce Williams, Assignment Editor, KGW NewsChannel 8

Moderator:
Angie Galimanis – Vice President, Lane PR

A few tips from the journalists:

  • Newsrooms hold daily editorial meetings; learn when they are, and try to call before they happen. You’re more likely to get discussed during the meeting.
  • TRANSPARENCY! This word echoed throughout the event. Be clear, straightforward and transparent. If you’re not, you will be ignored.
  • Mention your competitors; acknowledging your competition saves the reporter a step (see transparency).
  • Build relationships, and don’t reach out to a reporter only when you have something to pitch.
  • Email, but do NOT include attachments. Attachments clog email systems.
  • Journalists receive anywhere from 50-500 pitches daily, therefore be very brief and to the point. The subject line should be incredibly compelling and direct. Always follow up after sending your pitch, but don’t be obsessive.
  • Think like a reporter. What makes a good story? Sure your company may have sold five million widgets, but how does that affect the local community?
  • Put links in your press releases.
  • Do your homework. Learn what each organization wants, and what news each reporter or assignment editor covers.
  • Embargoes are still honored. Reporters want the exclusive.
  • Staffing at newspapers, TV and radio stations continues to decline. Journalists often have a hand in every aspect of a story. Only the most compelling stories will receive follow-up.
  • VISUAL, VISUAL, VISUAL! TV, online & print media want photos and videos. Each media outlet has a preference as far as what content they will use. One wants you to send your photos, while the next would prefer to shoot their own.
  • Local viral videos and trends on social media can turn into a news story. Reporters often tweet about a story that is still in process.
  • Because of deadlines and prioritizing, some stories will post online and not make it to print or the news hour.

The overwhelming themes were relationships and transparency. If you build relationships and are straightforward with the media, you are more likely to be viewed as a reliable source. It is not enough to blast out your story; you have to engage with the people you want to cover that story.

Business Wire thanks all our guests, the journalists and moderator for making this a fantastic event. Also, thanks to Lela Gradman at Nereus for writing about the event from the PR perspective.

Business Wire/Seattle is currently in the process of planning an event for the Seattle area. If you have topic or speaker suggestions, please email them to Lauren.Linscheid@businesswire.com. And make sure to look for other upcoming local events and webinars on our events calendar.


Twitter CEO Speaks to Role in Journalism and Communications at ONA12

October 3, 2012
by Chris Metinko, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/San Francisco

Chris Metinko

Twitter CEO Dick Costolo made clear two points while speaking in San Francisco recently:  he does not consider himself the current leader of free speech, but he does realize the company’s place in journalism and communications, and new tools are on the way to aid those industries.

Costolo made the remarks while speaking to more than 500 journalists and communications professionals at the Online News Association’s annual conference attended by Business Wire. During an onstage interview with Emily Bell, director of Tow Centre for Digital Journalism, Costolo laughed off a question about how it feels to be the head of the free press in the 21st century.

“I don’t view that as my job,” said Costolo, adding he considers Twitter a tech company in the media business. He, however, did acknowledge Twitter’s growing impact on the world of journalism and news dissemination.

“Hopefully Twitter has become a tremendously valuable tool to journalists,” said Costolo, who spoke at the same conference three years ago when Twitter had 80 employees. It now has 1,300 employees.

Twitter’s growing impact among communication professionals could be seen at the conference — where there were more than 34,500 tweets about the conference with hashtag #ONA12, compared to 20,000 tweets for last year’s conference. In a recent study, just under half of all journalists surveyed said they use Twitter for sourcing stories.

Realizing that impact, Costolo said Twitter is working on curation tools he hopes to make available to newsrooms to host live events on the social media platform.

“We have known for a long time that when events happen in the real world, the shared experience is on Twitter and we want to create an ability to curate events,” Costolo said.

He added that Twitter will have the ability by the end of the year to allow users to download past Tweets — something that could help many in the communications field with research and gauging public opinion. Although he cautioned the proposed timeline may not be exact.

“The caveat is that this is the CEO saying this,” Costolo laughed, “not the engineer who’s building this.”

Other tidbits form Costolo:

  • When asked about a Twitter phone, Costolo said he never says never but that is “not the way we think about the company.”
  • Costolo cited New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady as the person he would most like to see on Twitter who currently is not.
  • Costolo declined to give disclose Twitter’s revenues when asked — noting the positives of being a private company.

Why You Should be Alerting Investors via Mobile

October 3, 2012

News audiences, all of them, are on the go these days: More than half of all US adults own a smartphone or tablet, and more than 60 percent of those read news on their devices at least once a week. As mobile starts to complement – and in some cases, supplant – desktop usage, it’s important to make sure that you’re reaching audiences where they are. And that’s more true when it comes to market-moving news targeted at investors and analysts.

Nigel Malkin, president of Brand2hand Media, recently led a webinar for Business Wire called “Mobile Alerts for Investor Relations.” In this webinar, Nigel discussed the whys and wherefores of reaching investors by mobile. A few highlights from that event:

  • SMS open rates are more than 90% on average, compared to 22% for email
  • Mobile users generally open SMS messages within 4 minutes, compared to 6 hours for email
  • Different markets have different text character limits, and messages must be designed accordingly
  • There’s a definite way to structure your mobile alert messages for top effectiveness

You can listen to the archived webinar here, or view the accompanying slide presentation below.

Afterwards, learn more about how we can help you add mobile alerts to your own investor relations program.


Is Apple’s iOS 6 Update Affecting Your Search Traffic?

October 2, 2012

Last month, just prior to releasing the new iPhone, Apple released iOS 6, the latest version of its operating system for mobile devices – iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. And as SearchEngineLand details, that update may be affecting what you’re seeing in your traffic data.

Safari is Apple’s own web browser, and it’s used by nearly 87% of iOS device users. So if someone is browsing the web on an iPad or iPhone (which 64% of mobile users are) it’s likely they’re using Safari.

The important change here, which SearchEngineLand explains in great detail, is that someone coming to your site via a search using Safari’s built-in Google search box no longer shows up in your traffic logs as search or referral traffic.  They show up as direct traffic, no different from if they had simply typed in your URL.

This appears to be an unanticipated result for everyone involved, and may result in Google making some changes to how searches via mobile are forwarded to the destination site. In the meantime, though, be aware that searches showing up in your NewsTrak Reports and other analytics as “direct traffic” may in fact be searches from iPad and iPhone users.

Combined with last year’s changes that no longer pass search terms through from logged-in Google users, this adds another complication for marketers and PR people trying to maintain an SEO/SEM strategy. It’s a quickly shifting landscape, so make sure you’re aware of all the trends and changes before making adjustments to your own strategy.

 


New Study Reveals Trends in Mobile News Consumption

October 1, 2012
by Phil Dennison, Senior Marketing Specialist, Business Wire

A joint study by The Economist Group and the Pew Research Center for Excellence in Journalism, released today, explains how tablet and smartphone ownership is changing how people read news. The study, called “The Future of Mobile News: The Explosion in Mobile Audience and a Close Look at What It Means for News,” is rich in detail on topic after topic, including ownership trends, paywall effectiveness, mobile ad effectiveness, article depth, and more.

One table reveals what times tablet users tend to view news during the day, depending on whether they check news once or multiple times. The implication for corporate communicators: Make sure you’re releasing your news at the right time for your target media to see it, act on it and plug it into their own news hole.

Elsewhere, the study outlines the differences in news consumption among tablet user who use mostly apps, mostly their browsers, or a combination of the two:

Again, based on this information, communicators can decide whether it’s in their interest to target web-based online publications, to ensure that their news shows up in mobile news apps, or even whether they should be developing their own apps.

The complete study is full of data and information that will help your company develop its communications, public relations, marketing and mobile strategies. It’s worth a read by all professional communicators, journalists, and anyone connected to the news business.


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