“How the Hispanic Media Will be Covering the National Elections” Webinar Recording Now Available

June 28, 2012

If you missed our recent webinar, “How the Hispanic Media Will be Covering the National Elections,” fear not! A recording of the webinar is now available for your listening pleasure. A quick refresher:

  • Pilar Marrero – Senior Political Reporter/Columnist for La Opinión and Impre.com
  • Ruben Navarrette – Syndicated Political Columnist for CNN, COM Contributor, Voxxi.com Contributor, USA Board of Contributors, NPR Commentator, Poder Magazine Columnist, etc.
  • María Elena Salinas – Univision Network Anchor, co-anchor of “Noticiero Univision” and the primetime news magazine “Aqui y Ahora” (Here and Now)


  • Danny Selnick – Vice President, LatinoWire & Public Policy Services, Business Wire DC
  • Pilar Portela-Webb – Media Relations Supervisor, Business Wire Miami

Will the Latino vote elect the next President? It’s estimated that nearly 10% of the voters this November will be US Hispanics (a 26% increase over 2008 figures) — and many live in critical “swing” states. The presidential candidates and their campaigns recognize the importance of getting their message out to Hispanics. And no less interested are the mainstream and Hispanic media in covering the election. Time Magazine’s March 5 cover story “Yo Decido (I Decide): Why Latinos Will Pick the Next President” was a good example. This webinar will focus on how Hispanic media is covering and will continue to cover the national elections; and what the real issues of interest to Latinos are.


XBRL Update: New Functionality for Interactive Data

June 27, 2012
by Nicholas Messing, XBRL Accountant, Business Wire New York
Nicholas Messing

Nicholas Messing

The upcoming filing season looks to be one of the busiest yet for XBRL preparers, with all US public companies submitting financial statements to the SEC required to include detail-tagged XBRL as of June 15, 2012. As the XBRL mandate reaches full implementation for SEC filings, the functionality of XBRL continues to expand through various initiatives including the DATA Act, corporate actions, and Business Wire’s Retail Report.

XBRL has increased its presence in the US Congress with the Digital Accountability and Transparency Act, which the House of Representatives unanimously passed on April 25, 2012. Known as the DATA act, this bill provides for a broader implementation of data reporting standards to track federal spending data. Following its strong bipartisan success in the House, the DATA Act has been referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. Similar to the Child and Family Services Innovation and Improvement Act, which was signed into law in October 2011, the DATA Act includes a significant reference to XBRL: “In designating reporting standards… the Commission shall, to the extent practicable, incorporate existing nonproprietary standards, such as the eXtensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL).”

XBRL US released the 2012 Corporate Actions Taxonomy for public comment on May 17, 2012. This is the second version of the Corporate Actions Taxonomy, designed to tag over 50 types of corporate actions announcements, including mergers and acquisitions, dividends, redemptions, tender offers, and stock splits. Approximately 200,000 corporate actions are released each year in the US, and these textual announcements require time-consuming manual steps to process as financial data. XBRL tagging of corporate actions releases would enhance the efficiency of downstream processing across the financial community. XBRL US has teamed with The Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation (DTCC) and The Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT) to promote the use of XBRL tagging for corporate actions in accordance with the existing ISO (International Organization for Standardization) standards.

On May 3, 2012, Business Wire became the first commercial newswire to map, tag and disseminate its own content in XBRL format. XBRL exhibits utilizing the US GAAP taxonomy now accompany Business Wire’s Retail Report, which is released monthly to Business Wire’s full national circuit. Published on the day that retailers announce sales figures for the previous month, the report tracks specialty apparel and general merchandise retailers’ monthly and year-to-date total sales with percentage comparisons across periods, alongside comparative stores’ sales growth data. To date, the April and May 2012 Retail Reports have been published with supplemental XBRL files, which may be freely downloaded and rendered through the SEC’s XBRL previewer, to facilitate analysis of retail sales data. Two members of Business Wire’s XBRL team, Senior XBRL Financial Reporting Specialist Belayneh Alemayehu and Junior XBRL Accountant Khondakar Moin, have provided their expertise to translate the Retail Report into XBRL. While Business Wire’s XBRL team has been proactively preparing for the final wave of the SEC’s XBRL mandate, we have also implemented a new innovation in interactive data.

Social Media Fad or Future? Industry Insiders Offer Advice for Identifying and Embracing Both

June 26, 2012

by Chris Metinko, Media Relations Specialist/ San Francisco

In today’s culture, what is “now” becomes “then” in less time than it takes to tap out 140 characters. That’s why Business Wire’s San Francisco office recently held a media breakfast to discuss new trends, passing fads and what to keep your eye on in the world of social media.

“My niece and nephews aren’t even on Facebook,” said Tim O’Keeffe with the Horn Group. While not predicting doom for the social media giant, O’Keeffe pointed out both Twitter and Tumblr as sites he sees the most potential for in the communications filed.

O’Keeffe commented he sees social media still in its early adolescence — able to connect people to others they already know, but not yet effectively developing relationships between strangers.  However, current hit sites such as Foursquare, and up-and-comers like Path and the futuristic Project Glass from Google with its augmented reality headset, may help push social media into its next developmental stage. “Foursquare’s got this database of information that makes Yelp look like scribbles on a wall,” said Drew Olanoff, a writer and editor at The Next Web.

Of course Twitter dominated much of the discussion, especially with its recently debuted expanded news sites. “It’s changed everything,” Tom Simonite, MIT Technology Review’s senior computing editor, said of Twitter. “When you have a story, it’s not just thinking about the headline — it’s thinking about what you’re going to tweet.”

However, when tweeting or using any social media, the panelists warned some rules should be followed, or as O’Keeffe put it:

“With these tools come great power but also comes great responsibility,” borrowing the famous Spider-Man line.

“Be human, don’t be a robot,” said Simonite, adding these sites not just allow, but demand, users show some kind of personality.

Sam Laird, a writer with Mashable, added companies should use social media to be engaging and interesting, using the Los Angeles Kings’ Twitter feed as an example. While most teams tweet out photos or news, the Kings used their feed to crack jokes at other teams and rile up fans during the team’s run to the Stanley Cup. “It was fun,” Laird said.

Olanoff gave the best and simplest advice — but something not always followed. “Don’t be lame,” Olanoff exclaimed.

How to Make Your Online Video More Visible

June 22, 2012

  by Michel Rubini, International Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/London

The temptation to package your message in a video is difficult to resist. Video is brilliant at making complex concepts easily understandable. Video can engage an audience on an emotional and informative level in a way that text simply can not.  Not to mention that when it comes to press releases, we see that multimedia content, including video, can drive press release views.

Assuming first that you’re sharing quality, engaging content, you still must remember that a video made for offline consumption does not always translate perfectly for online distribution.

Keep it short – Online audiences are not as attentive as offline audiences. Distractions come in many ways when browsing the web. Online video should ideally be under three minutes long. The shorter the better.

Make Text a Friend Not a Foe – Google needs the text to find your video but the traditional uses of text on screen can create poor online user experiences. So what’s the solution?  Christian Heilmann, developer evangelist from Mozilla Popcorn, shared a possible answer at a Newsrewired event.

Chris Heilman Mozilla

Christian Heilman

Heilmann explained that video is a black hole on the web. Google is unable to go through a video like it goes through a text. A good headline and a lengthy description is all we have to make it seen.

So how can we make our video more searchable and more findable? Heilmann’s suggestion is to always separate your content from your presentation. Any text should never be in the images. Any text in a video should be overlaying it. It makes the text easily edited, translated, enhanced or deleted when required. Titles and subtitles and are loved by Google and therefore, as Heilmann puts it, “separation increases search-ability and find-ability . . . search engines have something to bite into.”

The big question now is: how do we do it? Heilmann is a big fan of HTML5 video as an answer to these problems. HTML5 video makes it more accessible on the web by allowing the maker to easily separate text and images. Text is over imposed and can easily be edited and found by search engines. Like music made of many different tracks laid on top of each other, HTML5 video text is placed in a running track. Different kind of texts can be added to different tracks. Broadly speaking, there are 3 different tracks:

  •  Subtitles: translations of the dialogue in the video for when audio is available but not understood. Subtitles are shown over the video.
  • Captions: transcription of the dialogue, sound effects, musical cues and other audio information for when the viewer is deaf/hard of hearing, or the video is muted. Captions are also shown over the video.
  • Chapters: they are used to create navigation within the video. Typically they’re in the form of a list of chapters that the viewer can click on to go to a specific chapter.

A good example of a video using the above feature is shown here:

The overlaying is unscripted in the coding itself. Suddenly, the invisibility cloak is lifted and the video is findable, searchable and flexible . . . all things you will most certainly want when sharing your videos.

A GUIDE TO GLOBAL IR: Leveraging Languages and Platforms to Reach International Investors

June 19, 2012
by Neil Hershberg, Senior Vice President, Global Media
Neil Hershberg

Neil Hershberg, SVP – Global Media

A recurrent theme at this year’s recent NIRI conference was the growing importance of global investor relations, and the corresponding need for international “best practices” standards.

The heightened industry focus reflects the realization that today’s financial markets transcend geographic boundaries, and that the competition for capital is more intense than ever.

While the spotlight on global investor outreach is certainly welcomed, the reality is that many of today’s accessible and affordable turn-key solutions are inadvertently ignored. The ability to seamlessly connect with a much larger investor universe is within easy reach of virtually every issuer; most importantly, it requires no budget-busting expenditures in the way of expanded infrastructure or staffing.

The key is to capitalize on the full potential of the major financial platforms that serve as the lifeblood of the global investment industry. Specifically, this means leveraging the multilingual platforms of the leading news/data systems, regional financial services that are hugely influential in their respective markets, and postings to non-U.S. portals that are closely monitored by the retail sector.

There is a natural tendency to narrowly view Bloomberg, Dow Jones and Thomson Reuters as largely an English-language bridge to international investors.  Yet these powerful, robust platforms reach investors worldwide in scores of languages. (Bloomberg, for example, hosts 41 languages.) This important capability is largely underutilized, and should be a strategic element of all multi-dimensional investor relations campaigns.

To be clear, English is universally recognized as the international “language of business.”  Yet there are sizeable audiences with substantial assets whose preference remains their own native languages. The major financial services, locked in a fierce competitive battle for subscribers, are keen to cater to these diverse constituencies.

Business Wire is the only commercial news wire that has committed the necessary resources to fully capitalize on this obscured opportunity. Simply put, Business Wire’s geographic and linguistic footprint is the largest in the industry, enabling public companies to target portfolio managers and retail investors in developed and emerging markets alike, reaping the unbridled benefits of these powerful platforms.

To put this potent opportunity into perspective, Business Wire releases are available in 19 languages on the Bloomberg terminal: Chinese, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Estonian, Finnish, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, Latvian, Lithuanian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Spanish and Swedish. The scope of languages available on Dow Jones and Thomson Reuters is comparable. Collectively, these financial systems approach some one million subscribers in the international investment industry.

Additionally, there are other prominent platforms popular with international investors that include Business Wire in more than a dozen languages, e.g. FactSet and Factiva.

Another important resource that is easily overlooked is the regional and national financial services that lack the profile — but certainly not the credibility or local influence — of their global industry brethren. These information providers can prove to be extremely effective in mapping an international outreach campaign with their pinpoint saturation of key money markets.

Business Wire content is broadly accessible via these respected regional providers, including SIX Information (one of Europe’s largest financial systems); vwd (a major presence in the D/A/CH region); Interfax (the dominant business news service in Russia/CIS); Agência Estado (Brazil’s leading financial news service); awp, the Swiss financial news agency; and Jiji Press, Japan’s leading financial news wire.

Supplementing these premium services, which primarily target professional portfolio managers, retail investors worldwide can routinely track corporate developments via leading financial portals, including such popular sites as Infobolsa, abcbourse, and BFMbusiness. Like Business Wire’s distribution network itself, our online reach continues to be a never-ending work in progress, with pending additions including Il Sole 24 (Italy) and Quick (Japan).

This year’s NIRI conference was entitled “Great Expectations.”  By simply leveraging readily accessible — and comparatively affordable — options, IROs are likely to experience “Great Realizations” in achieving their global outreach goals.

How to Reach One of the U.S.’s Fastest Growing Communities

June 6, 2012

by Chris Metinko, Media Relations Specialist, Business Wire/San Francicso

With the nation’s Hispanic population now topping 50 million people — or 16.3 percent of the nation — according to the latest U.S. Census, the importance of catering to Spanish-speaking media cannot be underplayed.

Earlier this month, Business Wire’s Denver office held a media breakfast to discuss just that, as well as the major issues and trends with greater Denver Hispanic media members.  The most obvious obstacle in reaching Hispanic and Spanish-speaking communities — the panel agreed — was in regards to language and trying to adjust to a population that is becoming more bilingual.

Reaching the U.S. Hispanic Market, a BW Media Panel

“The way things are going, you are seeing the Hispanic population really growing in the states and we are seeing people at different language levels,” said María Rozman, news director at KDEN Telemundo Denver. “We are seeing more people who are born here who speak both languages.”

Luisa Collins, news director at Univision Colorado, said the goal is to try and figure out if that community still chooses one language over the other, despite understanding both.

“Maria was talking about the Spanish language being spoken at home even if it’s a bilingual home, and one of the things that we see in the commercials — Spanish media research has shown — is that many of the Hispanic commercials are more effective than American commercials or those spoken in English,” Collins said. “So you have to know your viewer.”

As for what is interesting to the Hispanic community, Roberto Martínez-Maestre, general director of the newspaper El Hispano, said to not think to narrowly when pitching.

“One of the most important things is to stop having this idea that as Hispanics or Spanish speakers we are only interested in certain things or our needs are very exclusive or unique,” Martínez-Maestre said. “I, for example, in the newspaper or on my radio show don’t even sell it as a Hispanic media outlet. When I tell people what my newspaper is or my radio show is, I tell them it’s a newspaper and a radio show that happens to be published in Spanish.  . . . What the content is, it’s very general . . . The only difference is that I do it in Spanish. Do I focus on Hispanic needs? Not really, and that’s what I think we need to start doing more and more.”

Martínez-Maestre, added another thing to remember when pitching Spanish-speaking media.

“We all speak English, but if you are reaching a Spanish outlet, translate the release. If I get something in English I’ll read it, but then I think I have to translate it myself. It’s not being lazy, it’s being efficient. The Business Wire LatinoWire is all in Spanish and that’s very helpful,” he said.

“And provide someone who speaks Spanish for an interview,” Collins added.

JoAnne Hirsch, Business Wire/Denver also contributed to this post.

Putting Makeup on Your News Release: Tips for Getting Your News on Television

June 4, 2012
by Matt Allinson, International Media Relations Supervisor
Matt Allinson

Matt Allinson, International Media Relations Supervisor

I recently had the good fortune of making my way to the Rose City (Portland, Oregon) for a media event put on by the Public Relations Society of America’s Greater Portland chapter and featuring a variety of news presenters and news producers with KATU (Channel 2 – ABC affiliate), one of the city’s fine news stations.

Discussing what it takes to get a story on the morning news show “AMNW” at KATU were morning show co-anchors Carl Click and Natali Marmion;  morning show executive producer Karen VanVleck; assignment manager Nick Bradshaw; and photographer Bob Foster.

Morning news co-anchor Carl Click discusses his use of social media.

The quintet discussed a myriad of topics from crowdsourcing, to pitching, to finding experts, to the ever-present impact of social media on television news.

Click, who has worked in the Portland television market for 29 years, marveled at the meteoric rise of social media and its impact on traditional media.  Click says that he and his co-anchor Marmion realize that a lot of their audience check their Facebook and Twitter feeds first thing in the morning so it’s important they reach out to their viewership in new ways.   “Social media has overtaken us the last two years,” he said.  “Natalie and I are now very active with Facebook and Twitter on set.”

Bradshaw, the Assignment Manager at the station since 2009, said he’s willing to take pitches via Twitter, noting that the medium and other social networking sites have become so popular that it’s impossible to ignore them.  “We have so many eyes on Twitter now,” Bradshaw said.  “Two years ago, not so much – but now, we have to pay attention to Facebook and Twitter.”

But Bradshaw mentioned that while KATU closely monitors Twitter, they’re also less likely to pay attention to those who tweet too much (aka “Twitter polluters”).

No matter how you choose to pitch KATU (or other television stations) your news, there are some important things to remember according to Bradshaw and VanVleck: 1) Keep it short; 2) Pack it full of information; and 3) Include either pictures or video (this is of the utmost importance).  TV stations won’t do much with your news if there are no visuals according to the people most responsible for putting news on air.

Another tip the group offered that is always easier said than done:  make sure your news is interesting and will provide good content for the TV station.  “We don’t repeat news, unless it’s breaking news, if we don’t have to,” VanVleck deadpanned.  She also noted that TV stations love it if they can be pointed toward the people who will be impacted by the news you are putting out.  Like any news pitch, the more homework that is done and the more that is provided only increases the likelihood of a story being picked up.

And if your aim is to weave your announcement into the morning news show, at least at KATU, you’ll want to get it to them at least three or four days in advance.  If they want to make a story of your news, they’ll need to time to do it right.  Lastly, if they do run your story, make sure to be accessible for follow-up afterward.  Too often, says Bradshaw, the station will need to follow up only have the point of contact not be reachable.  Not only does this hurt the current story, but it can hurt confidence in using that source in the future.

Happy pitching. Throw fastballs . . . no curves.


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