SEO 102: More Press Release Optimization Questions from our Webinars


This is the second edition in my mini-series on SEO basics based on questions we’ve received in our ongoing webinar series on press release SEO.  In this post I address five questions that are a bit more advanced than those I answered in SEO 101, the first post in the series.

Should we embed a hyperlink in a press release distributed through wire services or put the URL in parentheses?

For wire releases on services like Business Wire, releases can be pushed to a wide range of syndicating sites using a variety of methods and technologies on all ends of the process.  Because of this, it’s often recommended to include both a hyperlink and URL in parentheses to ensure maximum reach across all audiences.  Don’t just take my word for it though, check out this Hubspot study on press releases that recommends following that link strategy.

Should keywords used throughout the release be linked to the target webpage every time within the release or just the first time?

Only Google really knows the answer to this one, but it’s widely regarded that the first link from a keyword to webpage on a page carries the vast majority of importance with search engines.    As long as you don’t go overboard multiple links within a release is not a bad thing, but it’s not necessary.

If you link too many times it might even look suspicious to the search engines.

Is it bad to use bullet points in the first paragraph of a release?

I recommend not using bullet points in or as the first paragraph of a release if at all possible, especially if getting into Google News is a priority.  Too many bullet points may cause the Google News robots to flag your release and reject it from the index.

Can I optimize my company boilerplate?

Absolutely.   Your boilerplate is part of your release’s body text in the many eyes of search engines.  Periodically optimizing your boilerplate with one or two strategic hyperlinks to key pages on your site is a great way to squeeze a little more performance out of all of your releases.

Should I use common misspellings or typos as keywords?

Using misspellings as keywords is quite popular in PPC advertising such as Google AdWords, but when it comes it press releases with their intersection of journalist, news and general consumer audiences, typos are typically frowned upon and eliminated by editorial staff.

In addition, search engines are continually getting smarter about spotting and correcting typos and the effectiveness of exploiting typos at all will probably wane over time.

That’s all for SEO 102.  You’ll be getting your diploma soon, but in the meantime please let me know via comments, e-mail or Twitter if there’s any questions you’d like answered.

5 Responses to SEO 102: More Press Release Optimization Questions from our Webinars

  1. leeodden says:

    If you want to know more about press release optimization, Google it! Nice post.

    • Joseph Miller, EON Product Manager says:

      That’s certainly a great way to get the “lowdown” ;)

      Thanks for reading, Lee. I’m just trying to cook up articles half as good as yours always are.

  2. […] series.  If you missed the first two posts, please follow take a moment to read SEO 101 and SEO 102 so you’ll be prepared for the final exam at the end of SEO […]

  3. Thanks for the link to the hubspot interview! And yes, as a former newspaper reporter I must agree – NEVER put typos or misspellings in your press release as keywords. It makes the press release look amateurish and reflects badly on your company – as if you can’t afford to hire a competent publicist.

  4. […] haven’t yet, I recommend taking a few minutes and reading through the previous posts: SEO 101, SEO 102 and SEO […]

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